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xricci
December 7th, 2003, 10:02 AM
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Jeremy Pelt was born in California on November 4,1976. While in elementary school, he started playing the trumpet. His primary interest was strictly classical music until he started high school when he began playing in the Jazz band. Upon completion of high scool, he headed back east to Berklee College of Music. While at Berklee, Jeremy worked diligently on Film Scoring during the day and cut his teeth playing at night.

After graduating from Berklee in 1998 with a B.A. in Professional Music, he moved to New York. Since his arrival, Jeremy has played with many distinguished artists such as Jimmy Heath, Ravi Coltrane, Roy Hargrove Big Band, Bobby " Blue" Bland, Bobby Short, Keter Betts, Vincent Herring, The Skatalites, The Village Vanguard Orchestra, David O'Rourke, Benny Russell/Jorge Sylvester Next Legacy Orchestra, Cliff Barbaro, Winard Harper, Duke Ellington Big Band, Dion Parson, Ron Blake, Charli Persip, Mickey Roker, Cassandra Wilson, Gary Bartz, Harold Ousley, Greg Osby, Frank Lacy, and many more.

Jeremy is currently a featured performer in the Mingus Big Band, Ralph Peterson Quintet, Lewis Nash Ensemble, Cannonball Adderley Legacy Quintet featuring Louis Hayes, Vincent Herring, and the Frank Foster Loud Minority Big Band. Jeremy has toured the U.S., France, Spain, Amsterdam, Switzerland, Japan, Virgin Islands, Brazil, and Great Britain.

xricci
December 7th, 2003, 10:04 AM
http://www.allaboutjazz.com/styles/jpelt2003.jpg

Close to My Heart
MaxJazz
2003

Website: http://www.peltjazz.com

xricci
December 7th, 2003, 10:05 AM
Have a question for Jeremy or a comment about his music? Please post it here.

GA Russell
December 7th, 2003, 10:37 AM
How has Jeremy come to know the people he has recorded with on his own records?

Valerie
December 7th, 2003, 10:47 AM
Just wanted Jeremy to know that I enjoyed him immensely when I saw him with the Mingus Big Band in Boston earlier this year. Also have enjoyed some of his original compositions.

If they decide to film Satchmo's life, Jeremy should definitely have the starring role!

I look forward to hearing more from this very talented young man!

P.S. He's got a great smile too!

Valerie

KolumBUZZ
December 7th, 2003, 03:11 PM
Jeremy, hey there. What is your favorite venue to play in and why?

JPelt
December 7th, 2003, 04:55 PM
Hi Everyone... Thanks for visiting my forum !! I'll try to answer all questions in a quick manner.

JPelt
December 7th, 2003, 05:06 PM
The great thing about everybody that I've recorded with on my CD's is that, I've played with all of them before. Mainly, in their bands (ie, Lewis Nash and Ralph Peterson) so the vibe is already there. Some artists opt to go for cats that they haven't played with just so they can sell the records, but with me I can honestly say that I know all of them so there isn't an air of mystery. Thanks to Valerie for her comment. FYI: when I was probably about 10 or 11, I tried out for a part as young Louis Armstrong in a play in California ! how fortuitous. My favorite venue to play in is easily the Village Vanguard because of it's immense history... I also love Ronnie Scotts in London for the atmosphere.

RonF
December 7th, 2003, 05:45 PM
Close To My Heart is superb, Jeremy!

JPelt
December 7th, 2003, 06:23 PM
Thanks. I'm glad you dug it !!

gcollme
December 7th, 2003, 07:41 PM
Jeremy, do still have a desire to do film scoring and any thoughts about this aspect of the biz. Who are your favorite film composers, past or present?

JPelt
December 8th, 2003, 07:06 AM
I have a strong desire to do Film Scoring, but it's matched (and probably surpassed) by my ambition to really make it as a performer, which is why I haven't put all my energy in pursuing Film Scoring... but one day. For now, I like Elmer Bernstein, Cliff Eidelman, Wojieck Kilar, Jerry Goldsmith, Howard Shore, aand Danny Elfman.

xricci
December 8th, 2003, 07:51 AM
Jeremy,

What are some of your all-time favorite films and which recent films would you have been interested in scoring?

Rooster_Ties
December 8th, 2003, 08:54 AM
In addition to your own releases as leader, and those with Ralph Peterson, I’ve been really enjoying the live material you've provided for downloading from your website. This raises an obvious question (which I suspect you get asked all the time)...

What are your plans to record and commercially release material reflective of your more ‘progressive’ side?? (And by the way, I totally respect you're wanting to let that music ‘gel’ and develop sufficiently, before going public with it – at least in terms of commercial releases. But I also really appreciate you giving us a peak into the future, by sharing all those MP3’s!!) And a related question/topic, that's perhaps a bit of a curveball...

Would you consider recording on a date lead by Andrew Hill, or perhaps Jason Moran???

Your playing, Jeremy, (in all your various contexts) often reminds me of several of the best “progressive hard-bop” trumpeters of the last 35 or 40 years -- guys who could wear both hats incredibly well, playing both ‘inside’ as well as ‘outside’. Of course I'm thinking of Woody Shaw(!!), Charles Tolliver, and late-60's Lee Morgan (particularly on Lee's more ‘progressive’ dates, more often as a sideman (like on Larry Young's “Mother Ship”) – or his very last studio album, and the live “Lighthouse” recordings in 1970). I think you (Jeremy) have a ‘fire’ in your tone that often reminds me of these three greats in particular.

For me, I find that some of those three trumpeter's most interesting material was recorded on albums lead by the great Andrew Hill (all three recorded with Hill on multiple occasions). I think Hill provided a unique context for them to play in – which was neither entirely 'outside', nor entirely 'inside' either. (I also mention Hill, because by some measures, today he's still at the very top of his game. And I mention Moran (being a student of Hill's), because he is developing music that has a similar flavor, with concepts similar to Hill.)

Or maybe a better, more open-ended question would be for me to simply ask what ‘progressive’ musicians would you like to worth with at some point in the future?? (Greg Osby, perhaps??)

Thanks!!! -- Rooster T.

PS: If possible, please bring one of your groups to Kansas City sometime. (I've been buggin’ a couple local club-owners about trying to get you in town, so I might as well work both sides of the same coin!! ;) )

sal
December 8th, 2003, 08:55 AM
Hey Jeremy!

First off, I love your music and think that you are one of the most talented horn players I've heard in a while. I am greatly looking forward to seeing what the future holds for you.

My question is this....with your solo career taking off and your move to the MaxJazz label, are you still planning on being a part of Ralph Petersen Jr.'s group into the forseeable future? The reason I ask is because that group is one of my favorites in jazz today. I think that you guys are really onto something great, but I know in jazz those things can't last forever. Its just that I see something special in the quintet that was/is present in some of the great combos thoughout jazz history, and I'm hoping that we can expect to hear much more in the future.

Thank you for sharing your time with us!

JPelt
December 8th, 2003, 05:42 PM
Well, my favorite movies are more of the adventure type (Indiana Jones, Star Wars) or else I love horror movies. I couldn't tell you which recent movies I would've liked to score. I think my niche has always been something dramatic, so anything in that line would be cool. Thanks for the support, Rooster ! Indeed I do get asked that question a lot. The answer is, I plan to record my group, "Creation" next ! As you noticed, I like to develop my band in a low profile before I set it off to the world. I find that it's most effective when going into the studio because you dont have to worry about having too many takes, and you definitely dont have to worry about a vibe ! To answer your next question, YES !! I would definitely record with Andrew Hill/Jason Moran. I have a tremendous respect for both of them and have played with Moran a bunch of times. I'm definitely into Greg Osby and wouldn't mind recording with him ! I dig "Symbols of light" and "Inner Circle". I think that I'd like to be included in all spectrums of the music. Freddie Hubbard was good for that, he was flexible in both environments and so was Dizzy Reece !! Dizzy was killin' on that Hill disc "Missing Ships" I was surprised ! So, any "progressive" musician you can think of would make me challenge myself to think in a totally different way !! I welcome it !

Well Sal, thanks a lot ! I also forwarded your post to Ralph so he can enjoy it too. I certainly hope to continue my participation in his group. He's one of the most talented drummers/composers/bandleaders we have out here. But, you are right, these things dont last forever in this business, and even the good things come to an end. In order for us to grow as individual artists, we all have to go down separate paths (that sometimes lead us to the same place), and it's never a personal thing (well sometimes ! but not in this case). Herbie and Tony left Miles' band for the same reasons, but it's all in the name of growth. That being said though, I think we have one more album in us ! Afterall, we have stood the "tests of time" and weathered a lot of things.

I'd just like to let everyone know, I've posted new MP3's on my website: www.peltjazz.com
There's something for everyone: for "Close to my heart" admirers, you have a live performance and interview from Sirius Satellite radio (complete with strings and new arrangements), and for my original music fans, a glimpse into another band that I have in the works ! Very experimental... Fasten your seatbelts !!

Thanks again.

ebrew
December 9th, 2003, 11:38 AM
First and foremost I want to let everyone know that Jeremy is a class act. I caught him at Blues Alley with Louis Hayes and he was very patient answering all of my trumpet/jazz related questions. I strongly urge you to take a listen to his MP3s. He has some fantastic material there.

Jeremy - it is good to hear that you are going to record Creation. I also like the fact that you gave the group time to bake before hitting the studio. In my opinion, nothing sounds better than a recording of a consistently working group. Miles Davis cut four of his best albums (Relaxin, Steamin, Cookin & Workin) in 2 days because the group had already established a vibe in the clubs.

How frequently do you practice with your group? Do you plan on touring with Creation (specifically in Washington D.C.)? I know that can be expensive but I hope you can somehow make that happen. I've been trying to get to NY to check you out but it just hasn't clicked into place yet.

Thanks,
Eric M. Brewington

catesta
December 9th, 2003, 02:34 PM
Jeremy, any plans on playing out west anytime soon?

montg
December 9th, 2003, 05:11 PM
Jeremy,

Your album "Insight" from Criss Cross is one of the great new releases this year--I've been enjoying it immensely since this summer. Thanks! Superb writing and great chops.

I was wondering if maybe we could learn a little more specifically what to look forward to in terms of recording schedule. I know these things can change but can we look forward to something from you as leader being released by the summer? On what label?

Also, who are a few of your favorite jazz trumpeters (past and/or present)?

Thanks for keeping the jazz flame burning bright--I'm so encouraged to see new guys taking this beautiful art form and doing new and great things with it

JPelt
December 9th, 2003, 05:43 PM
Thanks for ebrew !! We dont really rehearse frequently because of everybody's schedule. When we get a gig, then that's when we'll have a rehearsal before (sometimes the day of !)I'm always writing new material, so we always have a lot to rehearse ! Generally, I like for us to work out the kinks onstage. Mistakes aren't a bad thing to me ! What the listener hears is true creativity and work from the artists, and I dont like to stifle that.. As to when we'll be traveling, it's hard to bring a band on tour these days, but my manager and I are working very diligently at making that happen. I'm pleased to announce that I will be taking a quartet on the road to California in early January ! There will be significantly more dates as this year comes up (both in states and in Europe) so, we're doing it. I expect to be in Arizona, sometime maybe in late April/early May. As always, please check my website for up-to-date appearances: peltjazz.com
Thanks montg, for checking out "Insight" (I rather liked that date myself). As you may or may not be aware, my third (and debut) CD for the MaxJazz label, "Close to my heart" came out in late September. So, I have to let that sort of gain more momentum (although, I dont mind telling you, it's #7 on the Jazz charts !!!). I, hopefully, will return back in the studio next year to record my band "Creation". so, stay tuned. Until then, I will always have MP3's of my different projects on my website, so check in frequently (and leave a message, if you're so inclined !)

JPelt
December 9th, 2003, 05:53 PM
I completely forgot to answer who my favorites are... Let's see: Miles, Freddie, Booker, Lee, Joe Gordon, Carmel Jones, Kenny Dorham, Rex Stewart, Roy Eldridge, Clark Terry, Dizzy Reece, dizzy Gillespie, Fats Navarro, Tom Harrell, Thad Jones, Louis Armstrong, Joe Newman, Donald Byrd, and Joe Wilder, to start... and from the new crop.. Terence Blanchard, Nicholas Payton, Roy Hargrove, Ryan Kisor. Even some up'n'coming players like, Keyon Harrold, Jason Palmer, Mike Rodriguez, Avishai Cohen,and Justin Kisor... My all time biggest influence at the moment though is, none other than... DR.EDDIE HENDERSON !! He's been such a great mentor to me.

Saundra Hummer
December 9th, 2003, 05:58 PM
I knew a fellow in Hermosa Beach, Stu Linder, who worked in the motion picture industry, and ended up being a film editor. He did the movie "Bugsy" for one, and to my untrained notion of how a film should blend, I thought he did a superb job of it, as it just flowed. The nicest fellow you could meet I might add.

How difficult is it to fit everything into a time frame, and not have things all chopped up, so it isn't noticible, instead of a chop job where it is glaring that nothing is fitting? I would think this would be terribly difficult, or at least terribly time consuming. Do you work hand in hand with the film editor? What is the process in laymans terms?

I really enjoy movies that use existing songs by jazz artists, rythm and blues, and other pop songs to evoke the mood of the film in certain areas, as so much of the classical music has been done to death, not that it doesn't work, and work well at times. I think that a jazz background, to evoke a mood is great.

Great of you to post on AAJ, and be open to questions, and let us know your outlook on music. Thanks for the visit!!!!

montg
December 9th, 2003, 06:30 PM
Thanks for the reply! Interesting list of trumpeters...Joe Newman is an interesting choice, someone I've completely overlooked.

Congrats on the newest album moving up on the charts--and also on the Downbeat new talent award! And thanks for being generous with your time.

Rooster_Ties
December 9th, 2003, 06:34 PM
Hi Jeremy,

If I may ask: Who are your favorite "classical" composers?? – especially any 20th Century composers that you particularly like. (I know, Stravinsky – everybody says Stravinsky – but who else?? Maybe some names beyond what actually gets programmed for performance by orchestras these days.)

Also, what composers of film music do you most admire?? – especially in terms of your own ideas about composing for film.

Thanks for taking our questions. (Looking forward to hearing you perform in Kansas City sometime!!)

-- Rooster T.

Valerie
December 9th, 2003, 09:24 PM
Originally posted by JPelt
I completely forgot to answer who my favorites are... Let's see: Miles, Freddie, Booker, Lee, Joe Gordon, Carmel Jones, Kenny Dorham, Rex Stewart, Roy Eldridge, Clark Terry, Dizzy Reece, dizzy Gillespie, Fats Navarro, Tom Harrell, Thad Jones, Louis Armstrong, Joe Newman, Donald Byrd, and Joe Wilder, to start... and from the new crop.. Terence Blanchard, Nicholas Payton, Roy Hargrove, Ryan Kisor. Even some up'n'coming players like, Keyon Harrold, Jason Palmer, Mike Rodriguez, Avishai Cohen,and Justin Kisor... My all time biggest influence at the moment though is, none other than... DR.EDDIE HENDERSON !! He's been such a great mentor to me.

That's quite some list, Jeremy, but I'll bet you forgot Woody Shaw! Just a guess though!

Best to you,

Valerie Bishop

clifton
December 9th, 2003, 10:46 PM
Hello Jeremy. I'm impressed by your music and I'm wondering if you'll be playing in the Philadelphia area any time soon. Also I've been really digging Marcus Strickland lately and I'm wondering if you'll be working or recording with him again in the near future. Thanks for posting at AAJ and thanks for your music.

JPelt
December 10th, 2003, 12:27 AM
Wow !! I'm glad so many people are checking out my forum. First of all, Clifton: Thanks for digging my music. I'm sure that I'll be in Philly sometime next year. It's on the roster of venues to play at. Marcus is a great musician. There are no plans to record together anytime soon. Perhaps you heard "Brotherhood" (his sophomore CD), I'm on that...Hey Valerie. Woody Shaw, definitely gets my vote for the trumpet player that I have a lot of respect for. He largely (in my opinion) came out of Freddie (soundwise) but, developed his own harmonic concept and applied it to everything he played. That being said, I never was into Woody, like I was into all of those aforementioned trumpeters. But, I always respected and understood his place in the pantheon of trumpeters !! Hey Rooster; My favorite classical composers all tend to come from the romantic and baroque periods, like Debussy, and Ravel or Bach and Handel. Other composers include Rachmaninoff, Prokofiev, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Tchaikovsky. As for film composers, I like Jerry Goldsmith, Cliff Eidelman, James Horner, Howard Shore, and Wojiech Kilar.
Saundra, in Film Scoring there is a thing called stop valve timing, meaning you have to (after spotting the film) time those areas that you intend to score with a stop watch, so that you can get it precise. If there is a noticeable hack job, the composer obviously did not write for the film. Film Scoring is a different "animal" than mere composing. It involves creating a musical situation, that covers many different moods. that said, many of the early film composers were actually composers (ie. Eric Korngold, Bernard Hermann, Miklos Roza). As a film composer you do not work with the film editor. you have a music editor.

Keep the questions coming, y'all !

xricci
December 10th, 2003, 06:29 AM
Jeremy,

Just a quick follow up on film scoring.

Terence Blanchard and Mark Isham have each scored several films. Are there any other jazz musicians (past or present) who do this type of work? If so, who are they?

And you all play trumpet. Is there something about a trumpet player that makes him/her better suited for film scoring or is this strictly a coincidence?

JPelt
December 10th, 2003, 06:47 AM
You know, I think it is a coincidence ! (although, you can add Miles Davis, Jimmy Owens to the roster as well). Other names, such as Benny Golson, Oliver Nelson, and Duke Ellington come to mind. Today, you have people like Stanley Clarke, and Bob Hurst who do their parts.

Andy D
December 10th, 2003, 07:24 AM
Hi.

Just a quick question: I see that you have played with Ravi Coltrane, his last album is one of the best of the year for me. Anyway what was the experience like and how did you come to play with him?

Regards

Andy D.

Valerie
December 10th, 2003, 07:35 AM
Originally posted by JPelt
You know, I think it is a coincidence ! (although, you can add Miles Davis, Jimmy Owens to the roster as well). Other names, such as Benny Golson, Oliver Nelson, and Duke Ellington come to mind. Today, you have people like Stanley Clarke, and Bob Hurst who do their parts.

I would add Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter to this list although their work in film has been somewhat minimal. I believe Herbie even won an Oscar for 'Round Midnight.

catesta
December 10th, 2003, 07:43 AM
Originally posted by JPelt
I'm pleased to announce that I will be taking a quartet on the road to California in early January ! There will be significantly more dates as this year comes up (both in states and in Europe) so, we're doing it. I expect to be in Arizona, sometime maybe in late April/early May.

Excellent! :smokin:

kdd
December 10th, 2003, 11:47 AM
JJ Johnson also did some film and TV scoring. I've heard that JJ, Oliver Nelson and Benny Golson all shared work with each other. Hancock has done at least two others besides Round Midnight (was he actually the one who did the score to that one?). Jeremy, I've enjoyed all the three of your CDs (and your work with Ralph Peterson) but I was wondering, all three are distinctly different and for three different labels. Was the label you were recording for a consideration as to what sort of music you made for them?

Saundra Hummer
December 10th, 2003, 12:22 PM
Do you ever see Clark Terry?

I would love to be able to talk to him once again. Super nice, and what a talent! He has always been a personal favorite of mine, musically, and and there has never been a finer gentleman, and just fun to be around.

I was just a teenaged kid, seeing him live at the Lighthouse, and when he was leaving for another permanent gig, he made a point of coming over to tell me he was leaving. We exchanged our goodbyes, and other little niceties, and I never saw him again in person, just saw him on the television on the Tonight Show. This was in the late 50's, and to know that he is still so highly thought of by other musicians is great to hear. Never a nicer man.

JPelt
December 10th, 2003, 10:36 PM
Ravi and I met while I was still in Boston initially, but I can't remember (quite frankly) how we re-acqainted ourselves when I arrived in NY. I started out doing a weekend with him at the Iridium, and then I went to Brazil with his group. We're real good friends and he's got a wonderful family. Hey kdd, that's a good question... The answer is no they didn't. When I got the Fresh Sound "deal", I already had that music ready for months and I just knew I wanted to record it. With "Insight" I was thinking about expanding my group to a sextet and I had some ideas that I wanted to try out.With the Maxjazz deal, I decided that I wanted to debut with something grand, plus I wanted it to be a statement that paid homage to my influences. The labels at no time dictated what they wanted me to record. I've been very fortunate that way.Saundra: The only thing I can say is: CLARK TERRY WILL ALWAYS BE THE MAN !!

Saundra Hummer
December 10th, 2003, 11:10 PM
Sure will be!

I remember Clark so well because of his music, and talent, that and the fact that he has been out there in the music world so much, whereas it would probably be hard for him to remember me, as I just sort of dissappeared by moving away from Southern California, and just not being visable at all, and it has been forever since the day he made such a point of telling me goodbye, and wishing me his best. That was in the late 50's. I think it was before I was off of my crutches, so it was before 1957, or so it seems.

I also knew John Coltrane a little, and he sometimes would sit down where I would be, to have his coffee, and talk to me. He would even ask me which type of tune I liked the best, which part of the set, which I found amazing.

I have told this story a few times on this board, but I'll shorten it here, or I'll try. He would go out to eat his dinner on the strand, stand with one foot on the bench, stand there balancing his plate and cup on his knee, eat his dinner and watch the sun go down. He would be in the depths of thought. I used to go out when they were on their break and watch the sun go down myself, and one day I walked over to get a Jean Drink, what you call a smoothie now, and he asked if they were any good, and so I poured some into his empty coffee cup, a fresh peach drink, & he loved it, and bought one himself. We talked about peaches, and other things, he telling me how lucky I was to live in such a nice town, how lucky I was to be able to see such a sight as the sun set over the ocean every day He loved watching the sun go down, and said he wished he had something so pretty to see everyday. I asked him if there was any water where he lived, and he said "Yes, just a dirty river!' I aked him if at night the lights from the town reflected off of it, and said they did, and I told him that it must be pretty to see, as at night you couldn't see the trash or the dirt, and he agreed. I hear that after that, when he went through some hard times, he would stand on the bridge at night and play his sax all by himself for hours. This is heartbreaking to hear. I just thought he was the nicest, of course as we all know he had a talent that was overwhelming.

I did love to hear him play ballads, the soul of the man was truly visable when he did. I have seen him stop even the bartender in his tracks with the most inspirational playing you have ever heard. Tell Ravi that his dad was special in so many ways to all of us in our little beach town, and especially to me.

bubber
December 11th, 2003, 03:06 AM
Nice story, Saundra, but I always thought it was Rollins standing on the bridge practizing his horn?

MR JP: Just heard the latest Ralph Peterson Quintet and enjoyed it very much.
Would you care to say a few words on the difference of playing modal and playing on chords? Is there a different challenge involved? Do you prefer one to another? Is it easier to "noodle" on a modal foundation, and get away with it?

Andy D
December 11th, 2003, 03:10 AM
Hi Again.

You mentioned the possibility of possible dates in the UK, any firm plans for this? Have you played in the UK before?

Regards

Andy D.

JPelt
December 11th, 2003, 08:37 AM
Wow ! Those are some great memories, Saundra. Bubber, the difference between playing modal vs. playing changes ? Well, it's two different types of challenges. You still have to think harmonically, it's just in one (changes) you're relegated to playing what's on the page, and in the other (modal) you can use your imagination to take your improvisation to another place. I like a challenge either way. I like other not "routine" type of changes, like Wayne or Chick wouuld write, because they're really open. Andy... Have I played in the UK before ?! Of course, I've played at Ronnie Scott's six times already ! Though, there are no firm plans to be there with my band, we suspect that we'll be in there in 2004. Look out in February, for a feature article by Tony Hall in the Jazzwise magazine.. and as always, go to my website for updates.. www.peltjazz.com

Andy D
December 11th, 2003, 08:48 AM
Thanks for the info and I will look out for possible dates.

Regards

Andy D.

Saundra Hummer
December 11th, 2003, 09:58 AM
Originally posted by bubber
Nice story, Saundra, but I always thought it was Rollins standing on the bridge practizing his horn?

MR JP: Just heard the latest Ralph Peterson Quintet and enjoyed it very much.
Would you care to say a few words on the difference of playing modal and playing on chords? Is there a different challenge involved? Do you prefer one to another? Is it easier to "noodle" on a modal foundation, and get away with it?

This could be. I just have heard that John also did this.

I know that they say he stopped playing gigs for quite a while, and he would play on the bridge into the morning hours. Maybe an urban legend? Sounds like something he would do, or so I believe.

Spiman
December 11th, 2003, 12:07 PM
Jeremy, Two questions:

(1) What's currently in your CD Player/changer?

(2) When are you coming to DC?

Spiman

JPelt
December 11th, 2003, 04:13 PM
In my CD player right now, is the Complete Verve Roy Eldridge Studio Sessions and The complete Veejay sessions of Bill Henderson. I dont have a confirmed date yet, as to when I'll be in DC, but I suspect that you can expect to see me in 2004 for sure !

bubber
December 12th, 2003, 04:20 AM
IMHO his Verve "When you lover has gone" is one of the greatest trumpet tracks in jazz.

tkeables
December 13th, 2003, 08:07 PM
Hi, Jeremy!

I know that it was something that you did a while ago, but I was so impressed by the results of the ensemble on "Insight" (2002 Criss Cross Jazz 1228). I am a BIG Ralph Peterson fan and was new to your music. Of the 9 cuts on this CD, 7 are original compositions. Is this typical? Are there times when you prefer to explore your own touch on tunes penned by other composers (such as Ellington or Blanchard)?

JPelt
December 14th, 2003, 12:27 PM
First off, thanks for getting "Insight".. (I should mention that I have Ralph Peterson on my first CD "Profile" as well). The norm for a Jeremy Pelt record in the past, has been to spotlight my compositions, but as you heard on "Insight", I put my own arrangement of "Madness" together. So, sometimes I'll do something like that. On the flip side, my newest CD, Close to my heart, consists of all standards (well, mainly), and we did an arrangement on Mingus' Weird Nightmare.

JPelt
December 14th, 2003, 12:36 PM
So, what young trumpeters out on the scene nowadays, are captivating you all ? I just got a great debut album from a remarkable trumpet player named, Avishai Cohen. It's called "The Trumpet Player" (Fresh Sound New Talent)... Also, tell me your top 5, favorite CD's this year..

Lazaro Vega
December 15th, 2003, 12:58 PM
JP, I want that Roy box from Mosaic! Long time coming, those Verve sides. Also, the version of "Joey, Joey, Joey" by Bill Henderson with the Ramsey Lewis trio captures the dramatic nuances of that song better than most I've heard.

I don't know about top 5 recordings, but off the top of my head the Wayne Shorter album "Alegria," Ingrid Jensen's "Project O," Malachi Thompson's Africa Brass "Blue Jazz," the Cecil Taylor album "Student Studies" or Waddada Leo Smith's Golden Quartet on PI, and maybe Branford's "Romare Bearden Revealed." That's six and doesn't mention a big band date. 25 would be easier (!)

Don't know about "young" trumpeters: wouldn't that be you?:p Man, the way you come in from the strings on "All My Life" is goosebump time: what a catch.

Russell Gunn's new organ record is cool, but again, not exactly "young" nor old either.

I thought Avishai Cohen played bass?

sal
December 15th, 2003, 07:54 PM
Some of my favorite young trumpeters:

Jeremy Pelt (honestly....not just becaue its your forum!)
Terell Stafford
Maurice Brown
Alex Sipiagin

I don't know if these guys fall into the "young" catagory, but I really enjoy Nicholas Payton, Dave Douglas, and especially Roy Hargrove. While I'm not a huge fan of Roy's recorded output, I catch him live every chance I get, because he's one of the best improvisors I've ever heard.


My choices for top 5 new releases of the year:

1. Dave Holland Quintet - "Extended Play: Live at Birdland"
2. Kenny Garrett - "Standard of Language"
3. William Parker - "Scrapbook"
4. Greg Osby - "St. Louis Shoes"
5. Art Ensemble of Chicago - "Tribute to Lester"

Honorable mentions to the follwing reissues:

Miles Davis at the Blackhawk - Complete
Carmel Jones Mosaic Select
Grachan Moncur III Mosaic Select

JPelt
December 15th, 2003, 08:50 PM
Those are some interesting picks ! There are two Avishai Cohen's, the more famous one is a bassist, but the one I speak of plays trumpet ! I haven't heard Russell's organ record. When I say "young", I mean younger than me... 27. My favorite Roy record is actually "Of Kindred Souls".. Nicholas and Roy definitely fall into the 'young' category... Hell, they're younger than Sipiagin and Stafford... You get points for mentioning Carmel Jones !!

Rooster_Ties
December 15th, 2003, 10:38 PM
The trumpet-playing Avishai Cohen is also on another Fresh Sound New Tallent release, Brett Sroka's "Hearsay" (which also includes Jason Moran!). He's great on Sroka's disc, and he sounds like a real up-and-coming player.

Lazaro Vega
December 16th, 2003, 03:40 AM
Sal, I bought all of your honorable mention list this year. That Harold Land plays Folk Melodies in the Carmell box is one of his best recordings (second only to The Fox, imho).

sal
December 16th, 2003, 07:27 AM
Yeah, just about everything in that Carmell Jones set is beautiful! I think one of the reasons I like that set so much, aside from the fact that the music is wonderful, is that I had never heard of Carmell before I got that set! I bought it strictly on the advice of other jazz lovers, and it was truely the discovery of the year for me. That is one of the greatest aspects of being a lover of jazz music....the thrill of discovery. Funny, whether you're a fan, a musician, or both, jazz seems to always be at its best when it involves discovering something new.

Jeremy, have you heard this cat Maurice Brown? I'm not sure if he's from Chicago, but he's a Midwesterner I'm pretty sure. I heard him at this year's Jazz Festival here in Chicago in a jam session with Ira Sullivan, Ron Blake, Bunky Green, and a few more cats, and he absolutely stole the show! And later in the evening, he showed up at the Jazz Showcase for their after fest jam sessions, and once again tore it up. He's young, I think 23 or 24, and still relatively unknown. I think he just made his recording debut on the new Fred Anderson album, "Back at the Velvet Lounge", which I still have not heard yet. Anyways, he's an exciting young player that you might want to check out sometime.

The future of the jazz trumpet seems to be in very good hands!

tkeables
December 16th, 2003, 02:12 PM
I've been following Ingrid Jensen's work on trumpet and flugelhorn for a while. Most recently I picked up a Johannes Enders CD ("Bright Lights" on Enja) and Ingrid's presence truly enhances the saxophonist's date.

JPelt
December 16th, 2003, 05:10 PM
Carmel Jones, was also the trumpeter on Horace Silver's "Song for my father".. I have heard of Maurice Brown, and he is indeed from Chicago because that's where I met him when he was a teenager. He sounds good. Actually, I dont know what his recording debut was, but you can also hear him on Roy Hargrove's RH Factor.. I think Ingrid's sound on the Flugelhorn is one of my favorites...

ebrew
December 16th, 2003, 05:54 PM
Favorite Young Trumpet Players:

Jeremy Pelt - I've been listening since Sharp 9 Class of 2000. I’m a big fan of interesting composition and you definitely provide that. The CDs you made with Ralph are fantastic and the chemistry you have with Jimmy Greene is great.

Roy Hargrove - His sound is unreal... when he picks up the flugelhorn... look out. Favorite album by him is "Family" mainly because of the first two tracks (which should have been longer). I saw him with Herbie and Brecker at the Warner theater... solidified why I wanted to play trumpet.

Irvin Mayfield - I love his "When Passion Falls" album and the Los Hombres stuff is hot (pun intended). Met him at Blues Alley and he's a really nice cat too.

Nick Payton - What do NOT love about this cat? Tone, expression, ideas... I love Sonic Trance CD. Hearing that group live knocked me out. On his website he has a video clip of a song called "I'm Trying to Swing as Little as Possible"... it is off the hook.

Ryan Kisor - awesome player with mad skills and something to say.

There was this cat named David Young who did a CD called “Appassionata” that was pretty good but I haven’t seen anything new from him since. Anyone know anything about him?

I ordered Avishai Cohen's CD based on your recommendation Jeremy, so this list could change...

I know you didn't ask for it but my favorite trumpet players of all time are - Donald Byrd (I LOVE THIS CAT), Miles Davis, Freddie Hubbard, Kenny Dorham and Clifford Brown.

Top 5 CDs
1) Bounce (Terence Blanchard)
2) Sonic Trance (Nick Payton)
3) Insight (Jeremy Pelt)
4) So What (Eddie Henderson)
5) New Beginnings (Terrell Stafford)

Too prove that I don't ONLY listen to trumpet players I brought all of the Wayne Shorter's RVG reissues... his writing is amazing. AMAZING. I also enjoyed the Miles Davis Blackhawk set.

Tenorman
December 16th, 2003, 05:55 PM
Any thoughts on the Swing era trumpeters such as Harry James?

andreimatorin
December 16th, 2003, 08:22 PM
Hey man, i'm a freshman jazz-violinist at Berklee. Just had a couple questions. What were your ratings at Berklee? (i've heard brandford's were 2s and 3s and he never reauditioned—the maximum being 8s). And secondly, do you think, performance-wise, that there are things that you missed out on because of not majoring in performance?

JPelt
December 16th, 2003, 10:39 PM
Yeah, those are some bad cats you named, ebrew. Do you have "September Afternoon" by Donald Byrd (w/string arrangements by Clare Fisher) ? It's one of my all time favorites along with Cat Walk, Byrd in Hand, and Slow Drag.. You know, Tenorman, I cant say I've checked out a lot of Harry James ! But, I think I will...Berklee, huh ? You know, Andre, if I can be candid; I never did like Berklee for those reasons (ratings, and other bullshit), however if my memory serves me correctly, they were in the 3's/2's ! A word of advice: don't let those get you down. and, if they're good, don't get a big head about it, because most of the people that had high ratings at the school were sad as baby's funerals !! It's not about what they think anyway, it's about where you're going to end up ! I think I re-auditioned once, because I was required to do so if I wanted to be in the Blakey ensemble. (but, Billy Pierce wanted me in there regardless).. I don't know how Wally's is now, but if you want to get a real education on how to play, I suggest you go there as often as you can and sit-in... I could, absolutely, assure you that there was nothing that I missed not majoring in performance ! To me, that major is a complete waste of time and money. That's why I chose Film Scoring, because it was something that I loved, and it was a great way to spend four years in college and feel like you got something out of it. College can't prepare you about everything in performance... It's not gonna prepare you to have stage presence and to communicate with the audience.You have to learn from experience.. you have to live...

Rooster_Ties
December 17th, 2003, 12:22 AM
Another relatively young trumpeter I really like is Ralph Alessi. I can't seem to find how old he is on-line, but I suspect he's not yet in his 40's (I'm guessing mid-30s). But I did just discover that he has his own web-site: www.ralphalessi.com (http://www.ralphalessi.com).

I have a couple releases of his, as the leader - but I first came to know him through his work as a sideman on a couple of Ravi Coltrane's discs. Real interesting player. Kind of reminds me of Dave Douglas, at times (or at least that's the closest comparison I can think of, at the moment).

ebrew
December 17th, 2003, 11:01 AM
Originally posted by JPelt
Yeah, those are some bad cats you named, ebrew. Do you have "September Afternoon" by Donald Byrd (w/string arrangements by Clare Fisher) ? It's one of my all time favorites along with Cat Walk, Byrd in Hand, and Slow Drag..
I've been looking for that Byrd w/strings album EVERYWHERE... any leads you can throw at me? I have all the albums you mention above and you're right - off the hook. I also like some of the stuff he did with Gigi and the Jazz Lab (creative arrangements). I'm actually started transposing his solo from "Chant" earlier this week. I just wish I could sound like him!!

montg
December 17th, 2003, 08:29 PM
I listed my top three CDs for this year (new releases) on another board as:

Insight
Osby's St. Louis Shoes
New Jazz Composers Octet on Fresh Sounds

I saw Ryan Kisor with the LCJO this spring and he was really impressive--speaking of Harry James, Kisor had an amazing solo on Sing Sing Sing.

One of the things I like about Insight is the quality of the compositions. Jeremy, are there some young jazz composers on the scene right now that you really like? Ben Allison and Michael Blake from the Jazz COmposers COllective are two that I find particularly interesting. And David Weiss.

sal
December 18th, 2003, 09:14 AM
Hey Jeremy-

I had a question for you about practice.

I've been playing the drums for about a year and a half, and while I feel that I've progressed fairly well, I can't help but doubt if I don't practice enough. I always read about cats practicing anywhere between 4-8 hours a day. But for someone who is working a nine to five and still trying to be a good musician in thier spare time, its impossible to practice that much. I can rarely get over 2 hours a day in. My question is, how much do you practice per day now, and how much did you practice when you were still learning? And lastly, do you feel that people such as myself may be disadvantaged because either we don't attend music school, or simply can't devote more time daily to our practice regiments?

Blue Lake
December 18th, 2003, 10:26 PM
Another young trumpeter: Corey Wilkes. Anyone heard him?

Re: Ingrid Jensen, her organ record, Project O, was one of the year's best. She appears on a new George Schuller recording called Round 'bout Now on Playscape (www.playscape-recordings.com ) which is pretty much a tribute to Miles Davis, including Side Car, Circle in the Round and Filles de Kilimanjaro.

Kevin Bresnahan
December 19th, 2003, 07:13 AM
Jeremy, I've caught you a lot in Boston... probably as far back as Wally's. Did you and Darren Barrett ever go toe to toe there or was he after your time? I've seen Darren there many times but I can't remember how many times I caught you. That reminds me, I do have to get in there again soon. It's been a while.

Anyway, one of my saddest Jazz moments in recent years was when I attended a performance of your quintet at the Equinox Jazz Festival two years ago. God, there was no one there! I felt so bad for you guys. I was as despressed as anyone could get. Then, miraculously, you & your band worked a miracle: What a show! Any sad thoughts I had were washed away.:)

I was wondering how you managed to do that? I don't know if I could have. Was that hard for you and the guys in the band? Also, I hope that gig didn't wind up hitting you in the wallet. I was looking for a table where I could buy CDs. Anything to throw more money to you that night. I hope the gig was pre-paid.

BTW, don't feel too badly about the showing that night... it might have been something "in the air" that month. Later that month, I caught Sherman Irby at the Regattabar for a one night show and there was maybe 12 people in the crowd! However, just like you, Sherman managed to pick me up with his performance.

Keep up the good work and be sure to let us know when you'll be back in Boston.

Later,
Kevin

bubber
December 19th, 2003, 08:54 AM
Re playing for sparce audiences: Well, it has happened before. Dizzy Gillespie once started the introduction of the band saying:Lady and gentleman.... welcome to... etc.

Over here there's a story, not from jazz, but from speed skating, a man phoning the speed skating association ordering a pass,
ended the conversation by asking: "when do they start" and got the answer: "when can you come?"

Finally, back in the sixties a Swedish bop quartet toured Northern Sweden, and did a great concert for one person; the janitor of the community house they played in, half asleep in the back of the room.

JPelt
December 19th, 2003, 09:34 AM
There are quite a few young composers on the scene I dig. Among my favorites are: Marcus Strickland and Myron Walden. I can't honestly say that I've checked out Ben Allison, but I'll start. Sal, when I was getting into it, I was easily practicing 4 hours a day. I don't think you're at a disadvantage at all, by not going to school... All they're gonna tell you to do, is what you're doin' already, which is checking out the records, and if you need lessons, all you have to do is study with someone. You cant think of practice in terms of hours, you have to maximize the time that you have. If it's 2 hours, that's plenty as long as you target your weaknesses and go to work on them. Yeah, I know Corey Wilkes. How's he sounding these days ? Kevin, did I meet you at the Iridium this summer ? Anyways, Darren went to Berklee a few years before I got there (with Roy and Antonio Hart), but he did come back to do the first Monk Institute, which was then located a NEC. As for the concert, these are the times that you I have to look to as I rise from obscurity, the fact that it was pitch dark and that the few people that were there (including you !!), made enough noise so that it sounded like a lot of people !! So that was good, plus that concert was taped for NPR (it already aired this past spring). As an up-and-coming artist, it's inevitable that you're gonna have to start that way (especially, when you're doing it all yourself, no tour support, no major label backing !).. All I can do, is be very greatful that the people at the Equinox Festival, gave me a chance !! We need more promoters and club owners like that today !! It's not all about the money to me, I just want to get my music out there. There'll be plenty of opportunities to make the money that I deserve to make in years to come. Right now, I'm just accepting my position as an up and coming artist, and consider myself blessed to have the opportunities that I've had thus far. My current CD is doing extremely well (No.6) on the charts ! And I'm finally gonna get a chance to travel with the band.. I remember being in college,and Nicholas Payton came to do a clinic. He told a story of when he first to his band on the road to California (ironically, the first place I'm ever taking a band !), he said there were maybe 5 people there !! (and he had the major label backing). So, I'm not worried too much about it. I look at it as a necessary thing that you have to go through, a rite of passage before I could pack opera houses !! Give me another year,and the attendance will be much better !!

Hardbop
December 19th, 2003, 10:27 AM
Were you at the Vanguard last night?

If so, that was some set Cedar played with Roy. Actually, a couple of real nice sets.

JPelt
December 19th, 2003, 10:45 AM
No, I actually wasn't there... but, I bet it was killin'

Hardbop
December 19th, 2003, 11:03 AM
Originally posted by JPelt
No, I actually wasn't there... but, I bet it was killin'

You would have won your bet. You can really tell when a working trio peforms as opposed to a pick up band. And Roy Hargrove can still bring it with the best of them. I don't think that anyone expecting Jackie McLean would have been disappointed with Roy.

Rooster_Ties
December 20th, 2003, 08:53 AM
Since her name's come up a couple times in this thread already, I thought I'd also say that Ingrid Jensen (or at least what little I've heard - 2 CD's at most, I think), seems like a really interesting player. Some fire in her tone, but also something a little deeper, in terms of where she goes with her solos.

I don't have the technical know-how to describe it better than that, other than she often seems to make less obvious choices, even within fairly straight-ahead contexts.

I saw on-line somewhere that she had (re)recorded the entire "Miles Ahead" suite/album, with some European big-band, maybe the NDR Orchestra (or something similar). I'd probably be curious to hear that sometime.

Valerie
December 20th, 2003, 11:45 AM
Don't mean to make lots of folks jealous, but I'm really looking forward to hearing Jeremy in a couple of weeks at the Jazz Bakery in Los Angeles!!

Anybody else here able to make it?

Happy Holidays,

Valerie

JPelt
December 20th, 2003, 12:46 PM
Hey Valerie,

That's great, I'll see you there !! Tell all your friends... By the way, judging from your first post, I thought you lived in Boston !

Valerie
December 20th, 2003, 06:43 PM
Originally posted by JPelt
Hey Valerie,

That's great, I'll see you there !! Tell all your friends... By the way, judging from your first post, I thought you lived in Boston !

Hey Jeremy: I'm from Boston but have lived in L.A. for over 30 years. Because of my mother's ill health, I was recently staying outside of Boston for over a year.

Looking forward.... And I will definitely spread the word!

Valerie

P.S. Weren't you at the Iridium with Freddie H. this past September?

JPelt
December 20th, 2003, 06:56 PM
Oh, I see.. well, cool I'll see you next month. How did you know I sat in with Freddie ?! Do I have spies following me !?

Valerie
December 21st, 2003, 11:45 AM
Originally posted by JPelt
Oh, I see.. well, cool I'll see you next month. How did you know I sat in with Freddie ?! Do I have spies following me !?

No spies, Jeremy, just fans!! I was at the Iridium for the second set of opening night in September. In fact, Freddie surprised me by introducing me to the audience (but I wouldn't stand up!), said we'd known each other forever (which is true), hadn't seen each other in about five years, and he dedicated the tune he wrote for his sister to me. It was very sweet. It makes me so sad that this enormous talent has turned out to be a poster boy for how NOT to take care of yourself. I'm rooting for him though. Curtis gave him a good "talking-to" at the end of the evening. Lots of folks are always in his corner and I hope he will do his very best to try to regain at least some of his chops.

P.S. Enjoyed you that night, Jeremy!

See you soon.

Valerie

Trumpet Guy
December 23rd, 2003, 12:35 PM
Hi Jeremy--Just wanted echo the praise for you.I'm a huge fan of your playing and music.Man,the fire!Beautiful sound.I love that you have the great tradition in your playing,but are your own man.Very fresh to me.Yeah I hear a hint of Dr.Eddie but you've developed your own thing most definitely!You've done your homework AND are moving the music forward.Very inspiring for me!!I look forward to hearing your Creation band as well as your electronic band.

And your compositions!Lots o' variety,but I really am digging your approach to writing;especially the rhythm of chords that you blow over.I'm not good at describing music,but the rhythm section playing "offbeat" rhythms and chords while you improvise(ie.Sisyphus).Your improv feels very free rhythmically.Definitely builds excitement for me.

I play trumpet in Boston.So I'm thanking you for the inspiration you give me.I've met you years ago,but I'm sure you don't remember me...Any advice for building endurance?So I can play long burning intense solos, like you ;)


Wishing you all the success you truly deserve!!--Phil G.

Edit:Yeah,no doubt you and Avishai Cohen are my faves!!

JPelt
December 23rd, 2003, 01:17 PM
Phil G. ? Is this Phil Grenadier ? Thanks for the compliments ! If this is the same Phil I'm thinking of, then I'm a fan of yours as well ! I definitely remember meeting you in Boston a couple of times. You came to Wally's and laid some lines out on "Bolivia" ! I actually heard your Fresh Sound CD at a friends house (he wouldn't let me steal it) So, I'm trying to find it !! Anyhow, for endurance I just try to pace myself, especially when playing with drummers like Ralph !! That and playing long- tones very soft. Really that's it ! Hey man, if you haven't heard the electronic band or Creation yet, I have live MP3's on my website: http://www.peltjazz.com... Man, it was good hearing from you ! (if this is Phil Grenadier !, if not, it was good hearing from you anyway !)

Trumpet Guy
December 24th, 2003, 10:24 AM
Wow Jeremy! You got me!

Well, I'm surprised that you remember me(you have an excellent memory)& thrilled that you have heard one of my cds!!Thank you for the kind words and also for your endurance advice.I'm gonna get on that advice.Do you treat them like Caruso's?Or do you play a long tone and then rest?

I'm also gonna' check out your Mp3's for sure!

Thanks,man.I hope to be able to see/hear you live(in person) real soon!

P.S.--I can empathize about searching for Fresh Sound releases--Still tough!!I'd be glad to send you a copy of my newest...I've got 2 of yours,but have never seen your FSNT:(

JPelt
December 24th, 2003, 10:44 AM
Hey Phil, I'm glad it was you, because I'd have felt stupid if it wasn't... The funny thing is I was just asking your brother about you (I met him at a record date for Erin Bode, a new MaxJazz singer). As for the endurance, I just play long tones and rest, non-Caruso. As for the FSNT, maybe we can do a trade. E-mail me at peltjazz@earthlink.net...

Valerie
December 24th, 2003, 11:54 PM
Originally posted by JPelt
Hey Phil, I'm glad it was you, because I'd have felt stupid if it wasn't... The funny thing is I was just asking your brother about you (I met him at a record date for Erin Bode, a new MaxJazz singer). As for the endurance, I just play long tones and rest, non-Caruso. As for the FSNT, maybe we can do a trade. E-mail me at peltjazz@earthlink.net...

i just love reading the exchanges of young (to me!) talents like jeremy and phil! i met phil in boston and was already impressed with his talent but then was very taken with his modesty and vibe as a human being when i exchanged with him. i never take that stuff very lightly. just adds to the appreciation of these artists as special all-round folks.

KolumBUZZ
December 25th, 2003, 09:06 AM
I know one thing that Trumpet Guy and myself have agreed about here in the past is that Wallace Roney gets an unfair rap by critics, and even by some musicians. Everyone wants to lay that "Miles clone" tag on him without even really listening to what he's doing. He's actually pretty damned distinctive as a trumpet voice IMO. Kenny Garrett said that Wallace is the only trumpet player he feels is really doing anything significant. What do you think about Wallace's playing Jeremy?

Trumpet Guy
December 25th, 2003, 11:14 AM
How nice of you to say, Valerie.Thank you for that.

I hope you have great holidays & a happy New Year!!

Both Jeremy & I are from Cali--so we know you're not having a white X-mas ;)

JPelt
December 25th, 2003, 05:32 PM
Wallace Roney is one of the baddest cats out there ! I remember when I first heard him on the Miles Davis tribute w/Quincy Jones, I didn't think he sounded like Miles at all. Then I got "Seth Air" and I began to hear what the critics were talking about. Here's my opinion, I can see why critics and listeners alike will say that he sounds like Miles. Quite frankly, he does ! Let's not beat around the bush. However, what he has done (in my ears), is extended the chromatic concept that Miles was dealing with. If you listen closely to what he's playing, there are some leaps in his lines. On the whole, I dont think his playing is completely original, but I think think that he's successful in extending the chromatics that Miles laid down, thus not being a "clone"... I've heard Wynton a number of times, and it really never occured to me until one time last year that much of his phrasing is attributed to Clark Terry ! People never get that, you'd be amazed. If you listen to "The Happy Horns of Clark Terry" especially on the "In a mist" track, it reminds me directly of something Wynton would play ! I say all of this to say, it's hard to find someone playing something completely original. One thing that got on my nerves about listening to Wallace on record was his sound.. every CD I have of him, his sound sounds thin ! But, when I first heard him in person.. forget about it !! He's got a real thick sound. I just wish he would do something about that. But to answer your question, I love his playing and very much admire his ability to stay the same no matter what anyone is saying !!

andreimatorin
December 25th, 2003, 05:35 PM
Hey jeremy, thanks for ur reply!! My 4s and 5s looked puny compared to one of my friend's getting straight sevens coming in. But I guess, it's really not what matters anyway. Ya, i haven't really checked out wally's yet, but i just finished my first semester and have been busy trying to adapt to this new environment and change my practice habits. I hear people talking about it pretty often. Godwin (my friend who got 7s, alto sax cat) was jamming there the other night with danilo perez in the audience. Danilo was impressed and approached him afterwards asking for his info and stuff. But Godwin couldn't recognize him cause danilo was kinda disguised i guess. He ended up forgetting about danilo and leaving without having given his number or anything. He was so upset when he found from a friend who it was :). But then they saw each other again...

Can I ask you what one of your typical practice sessions is made of?

Saundra Hummer
December 25th, 2003, 06:04 PM
Hello Jeremy!

Hope that your Christmas was special, and joyous, and that your New Year will be spectacular!

I'm not a musician, nor am I able to keep up with the jazz scene like I used to, but I do know this: it is unavoidable to end up being like someone you have been around for much of your life, you pick up their mannerisms, their speech patterns, and other traits. The same with artists, say paiinters, they, in one way or another, feed off of oneanother, it is almost unavoidable, as they have all learned from one anothers works.

With musicians spending so many hours listening to their favorites, practiciing and practicing, hour upon hour, then rehearsing hour upon hour, it is just bound to happen, whether or not someone is intentionally trying to copy someone or not, it seems to me that someone who they have listened to and listened to, (say like Miles,) style is bound to end up a part of his own style. It is like it is inevitable that their style will filter into his. especially if he has been so one dimensional that he hasn't built up life experiences of his own; experiences that puts soul, and joy, and any other emotion into his work, experiences that are his and his alone.

A sophormoric view of it perhaps, but this is how I see it.

JPelt
December 25th, 2003, 06:24 PM
Hey Saundra, trust me when I say that there is nothing sophomoric about what you said.. It's true. I also tend to think, that one of the reasons it's hard for cats to get an original sound because we have so much available to us (internet, TV, etc.), so it's not unreasonable. It just means that we're gonna have to work that much harder to get are own thing happening. I agree that living/experience has a lot to do with it, which is why I hate when record labels (particularly the majors), label their artists as "fresh" and "new", as if they even know !! Anyways, let me stop rambling...As for you Andre, my practice when I was getting myself together was basically 4 hours of straight transcribing everyday. Nowadays, I focus on getting the trumpet together (flexibilities and control). I try to play everday to keep my consistency up. (Lord knows the trumpet is a very "unforgiving" instrument)

closer250
December 27th, 2003, 07:42 AM
Hello Jeremy!

I too have been enjoying your music - mostly from your official website, which I think is great that you make your music available like that for cats to check out.

Anyway, my question is if you have considered (or have any current plans of) performing in Kansas City in the near future?

It would be great to hear you guys live!

Peace, Cb

JPelt
December 27th, 2003, 07:35 PM
Hey Man.. Thanks for checking out my stuff online ! Look for me sometime in April.. I've been talking to Gerald Dunn, and I should be making my way out there soon... My website will keep you posted...

closer250
December 27th, 2003, 10:05 PM
Originally posted by JPelt
Hey Man.. Thanks for checking out my stuff online ! Look for me sometime in April.. I've been talking to Gerald Dunn, and I should be making my way out there soon... My website will keep you posted...
Most EXCELLENT !!! Gerald is a great cat and the Blue Room is a great room to play here - you guys will "kill"... I'll be there and maybe we can hook up and go eat some Kansas City Bar B Q, if your scheduled itinerary allows the time too. :D

Peace, Cb

sal
December 28th, 2003, 06:43 PM
Man.....now I'm starting to get jealous of all you other cities......hey Jeremy, any chance you guys might make it to Chicago next year??

JPelt
December 28th, 2003, 07:28 PM
Don't worry Sal, we're talking with the Showcase right now.. we'll be there at some point..

tkeables
December 28th, 2003, 09:57 PM
Hi, Jeremy!

Have you explored Latin rhythms much? I was listening to a CD by Jerry Gonzales and the Fort Apache Band this weekend and could only imagine what you would bring to that context (serious brass and lots of percussion). What is something innovative that you might try?

sal
December 29th, 2003, 10:34 AM
Originally posted by JPelt
Don't worry Sal, we're talking with the Showcase right now.. we'll be there at some point..


Excellent!! I will be eagerly checking their website!

JPelt
December 30th, 2003, 02:02 AM
Hey TKeables,

Y'know, I haven't explored latin rhythms (outside the regular) much. There are a lot of things I need to check out, but there's time..I can't quite let you know what new innovative things I may try, because that's something you have to develop into ! I might not even realize stumble unto whatever it is for years to come.. we'll just have to wait and see...

KolumBUZZ
January 1st, 2004, 05:42 PM
Thanks for the reply Jeremy. It seems like Wallace also has quite a bit more technique than Miles ever did. In fact to these ears he seems to play with the kind of rapid-fire fluidity that Woody or Freddie do, if not with the kind of force that those guys did. Have you heard Wallace on the Herbie Hancock Future 2 Future DVD?? Man, all he's doing is pretty simple intervallic and chromatic stuff but he does it about as fast and cleanly as I've ever heard it done.

sal
January 4th, 2004, 09:48 AM
Hey Jeremy....Happy New Year to you and everyone else!

I was listening to your excellent album "Insight" yesterday and today, and it made me think of a question for you. Of all the albums you've either made as a leader or appeared on as a sideman, which one is your favorite and why?

JPelt
January 4th, 2004, 10:29 AM
What an unfair question:wink2: Actually, I've got a couple favorites (I can't narrow it down to one): "Art of War", "Brotherhood" (Marcus Strickland), "Profile" , "Close to my heart" and Wayne Escofferey's upcoming CD (spring)... That's about it..

mmckay
January 5th, 2004, 09:47 AM
Hi Jeremy,

I have been listening and reading about you for the past 7 days, I had the pleasure of hearing you on my local jazz station, and was drawn in from the first phrase. Since the first hearing I have torn through your entire website listening to every interview and mp3 and have enjoyed the opportunity immensely. I have to say you have certainly studied the greats and synthesized it into your own style. What a gorgeous tone, and I truly admire your phrasing and lack of useless technique. I have several questions for you about what you do and how you do it. A little about myself, I am a 23 yr. old trumpeter, and an aspiring jazz musician in a small Midwest town going to school for jazz studies. Hope that we can communicate soon. til then! Take care and keep blowin'

Marlin

JPelt
January 5th, 2004, 09:58 AM
Hey there, thanks for checking out my stuff ! Fire away with the questions..

mmckay
January 5th, 2004, 10:05 AM
Well Where do I start,

first of all I have been listening to your live sessions all morning. Fantastic!!!!! Did you study with Dr. Eddie Henderson, he's one of my favorites? It seems like we have so much in common I don't know where to begin. I am originally from Texas and recieved a full scholarship to play trumpet for the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, but I have grown so much in the last three years that people are upset that I am still here not realizing that I just got here. I guess I have questions about good schools good teachers practicing changes how did you promote yourself before MaxJazz how did you do demos with no funding from a label? Sorry if this is all too much I am just so excited to be talking with a future jazz master!

Marlin

JPelt
January 5th, 2004, 10:43 AM
Hey Marlin,

I didn't study with Doc. I've sat next to him in the Mingus Band for years and learned through osmosis. Plus, we're really good friends. He's very supportive... As for schools, it's always a sensitive topic for me. Generally, I tend to think that as long as you know what you need to do, then paying 20,000/year is ridiculous, unless you're majoring in something else, ( I went to Berklee and majored in Film Scoring). Good Teachers are everywhere. I had two great ones while I was in Boston. Ray Kotwicaand Charlie Lewis. Keep in mind that these were both 'legit' teachers. All improvisation was learned from the records and just playing in general. Promoting yourself is a hard thing to do, (particularly, if the label doesn't provide any assistance). For my first two releases, I'd have to say that my manager worked her ass off to make sure that the press was alerted. It also helped that I'd been on a couple of other people's CD's, so the press was a little more receptive to writing about me. As instrumentalists, we're definitely in a space where we have to sacrifice to make it, and I think that it's going to be like this for a while.

mmckay
January 5th, 2004, 11:11 AM
If you don't mind me asking, what Trumpet and Flugelhorn do you play mouthpieces as well. Before I go any further, thankyou for responding so quickly to my postings, I would also like to add I have free long distance on my phone if you ever wanted to talk about more of this, but basically what you're saying is that I should probably just finish my degree and just practice on my own? Do you have that Donald Byrd album I bet it's absolutely amazing. I haven't actually done a tremendous amount of transcribing maybe ten solos but I have tons of recordings. I read that you would spend 4 hrs a day transcribing, what else were you doing to familiarize yourself with chord changes, tunes, phrasing? Do you think I should look for a manager, I graduate next spring from school. I am really close to both Chicago and Minneapolis.

JPelt
January 5th, 2004, 11:28 AM
No, I dont mind at all: I play (and endorse) Conn Vintage One trumpet's and Flugelhorn's complete with mouthpieces. Your post is a little confusing, which Donald Byrd record are you referring to ? As far as the transcribing, and changes: I would transcribe the particular artists' nuances, in other words, how he phrased it exactly. One way you can famiarize yourself with the changes is by going to a piano, and seeing why certain lines work on certain chords. I think it's important to SEE the function on the piano. I dont think you should look for a manager until you have a representive body of work that can speak for itself ie, recordings that have been released widely), otherwise, you'll just be wasting money. Wherever you end up, you'll have to be on the scene for a while before you get picked up, so my advice is just to be an active part of the scene and then things will come your way...

mmckay
January 5th, 2004, 11:43 AM
Lol Sorry,

I was listening to one of your interviews from Sirius Radio session Live Vol. 8 and you mentioned that you heard Donald Byrd play It's a beautiful evening and it was with strings I believe. I got so rapped up in lstening to your interview that I thought you were there in person. Lol:D sorry if I seem frazzled but I am a little intimidated to be talking with you so fluent. I don't have these dreams of being famous but I certainly would like to be playing regularly with like minded individuals that perform at a high musical level so that I can feel some small part of what my musical heroes were feeling. This means that I just want to learn the language and communicate.

JPelt
January 5th, 2004, 11:54 AM
Oh that album !! It's killin' !! Do you have it ? That version doesn't have strings, but the vibes give it a real dreamy sound, and Byrd just lays his heart on the line ! He'll bring a tear to glass eye..Please dont be intimidated. Learning the language is key...

mmckay
January 5th, 2004, 12:41 PM
I looked the album up: Donald Byrd Out of this World

The lineup is out of this world, I will buy the album thanks. Do you have a day job, or what does your typical day look like as far as work. I know it has to be expensive to live in New York how do you combat those issues? Are you into Blue Mitchell at all? I have the complete Blue Note Sessions and they are great!! Have you heard anything else about possibly playing the jazz showcase in Chicago, I would love to meet you and hear you play live? Can you recommend any good books that you feel have helped your playing or your mind? i.e. George Russell's Lydian System of Tonal Organization, or Kenny Werner's Effortless Mastery, any other recordings that you think would be helpful.

mmckay
January 5th, 2004, 12:50 PM
I just thought of something I would like to know,

not that this is the most important part of playiing by far, but how did you approach bebop and also playing fast and accurate. I have established nice eighth note lines but have the urge to express faster lines at times and sometimnes can only hear part of the idea, meaning a great line up but can't seem to finish it?

JPelt
January 5th, 2004, 01:40 PM
I'll say this, Marlin. To be able to execute ideas fast, you have to practice them slow. Perhaps, you could practice with a metronome.

ebrew
January 5th, 2004, 06:09 PM
Jeremy - here is one for you (hope it isn't a dumb question)...

Does anything that you learned with regards to film scoring help you with improvisation? I have no clue what is covered in the courses but does it help you approach writing differently or allow you to hear things better in jazz?

By the way - I'm glad that you mentioned "Art of War" as one of your favorite CDs. It is definitely one of mine. Your solo on "Freight Train" is KILLIN!!

KolumBUZZ
January 5th, 2004, 07:10 PM
Hi again Jeremy. Whenever you get around to it, I'm just curious to know how you like living in New York, and whether you want to stay around for very long...

mmckay
January 5th, 2004, 08:26 PM
Well after today I have to say that Jeremy Pelt is THE MAN, not only is he an outsatnding trumpeter/musician, he is to me the most humble and helpful trumpet player I have ever met next to Marcus Printup. Jeremy I want to personally thank you for taking the time out of your schedule to answer my questions and give your advice. I hope that we can continue to communicate and I don't know how I could help you but if there was ever anything you needed please do not hesitate to ask. Futhemore I wish you much luck and success in your new release and your career, and I will be spreading the word of your talent. I hope this doesn't sound too final, but I just want to make sure that I properly thank you for your help. Your playing to me is the most promising that I have heard in the tradition of trumpet greats, Strong sense of melody, plenty of technique used in a melodic way never too flashy, and a gorgeous tone. Thanks again your friend,

Marlin

JPelt
January 6th, 2004, 02:17 AM
Now see, Eric, one of the reasons I like music so much is because it can make you feel many different ways. Film Scoring is great because you are able to portray the emotion in that particular scene through music, which is why it fits so well with Jazz. Film scoring itself doesn't help my improv, but viewing each solo you create as a story works hand in hand with my love for cinema. as for Kolum, I Love NY... I was born in Cali, but I spent summers in the Bronx since I was 4. For me, NY has the craziness that I need to create. I cant acheive that anywhere else. When I get older, I wouldn't mind buying a house in Connecticut,I'd still be close to the city. I love life happening around me. And finally, Thank You, Marlin ! That was thoughtful. I truly believe that we all have to help each other. If there's something that I have (knowledge-wise) that you need, I always like to try my best to share it.. After all, that's how information is passed down.If you have anymore questions, please dont hesitate to e-mail me: peltjazz@earthlink.net

Rooster_Ties
January 6th, 2004, 06:29 AM
Hi Jeremy,

Not really a musical question, but since we have this great opportunity to get to know you a bit better, would you share a bit of some of your other interests with us??

Any particularly favorite books/authors, films/directors, and/or buildings/architects that might be favorites of yours?? Or any other kinds of topics/mediums that you have a passion for?? How about 'hobbies'?? Anything from rock-climbing, to building little ships out of toothpicks inside of glass bottles. ;)

(Wow, I don't think I realized what a lame word 'hobbies' probably is, until I just used it here just now, for the first time in years. :p )

JPelt
January 6th, 2004, 09:51 AM
No Problem... I am a big movie goer..HUGE !! I just like being entertained... Aside from that, I dont have a favorite writer, I tend to like biographies or auto-biographies. I just finished the Carmen McRae biography.My favorite screenwriter would be David Mamet. Those are my passions.. Although, I'd be remiss if I didn't say that I like, no LOVE, MTV (dont tell anybody !). and football (though the Giants suck this season)...

mmckay
January 9th, 2004, 12:05 PM
Hey Jeremy,

Hope all is well with you, I wanted to ask you a question about your perception of the rigors of going from jazz to classical and vice versa. I have found that for me I kind of lose my touch with the articulation. Have you had any similar problems or situations. I know that you mentioned long tones for endurance, would you mind describing the manner in which you practice them.

Thanks,

Marlin

JPelt
January 9th, 2004, 06:13 PM
Hey Marlin, Good question ! Since, I dont do classical anymore, I'm more into improving my Jazz articulation.. though, I imagine that going between both Jazz and Classical could be quite a challenge, I dont envy those that do it. However, if that's your thing, I'd say that the most important thing to maintaining both levels is most definitely the warm-ups. For me, I'm all about the schlossberg flexibilites (though admittedly some days are better than others !). As for long tones, all I can tell you is the softer you do them, the more control you'll have of your wind AND the horn. It's all about control ! Hope this answer works for you... On another note, I'm in California right now, on my first tour as a leader ! The reception has been overwhelming !

mmckay
January 11th, 2004, 02:42 PM
Hi Jeremy,

That's great to hear that the people love you, but I don't think that it's the people as much as it is the fact that you are the real deal your playing speaks for itself and you will continue to draw you audiences in with your music and personality. Thank you for replying to my email. At this point I am doing both classical and jazz as well as Lead in the big band however, I would like to just be playing jazz. I was just curious about whether or not you can truly have as much technique and tone when not being challenged to play what freaky thing is written on the page, and if you felt that you could come from playing jazz and go right into playing classical without any physical limitations. Sometimes I feel that I am playing some really good jazz and then I will play a classical etude and sound like crap on it at first and that really frustrates me. I am working on forming a new group to do some gigging in the Twin Cities area, and I hope to have some material worked up to maybe do some recording would you be interested in hearing it when it is completed? Talk to you later,

Marlin

Keep blowin' man

Noj
January 13th, 2004, 08:47 AM
Mr. Pelt, I heard one of your songs on the radio this morning and it was excellent! Just thought I'd send some praise right to the source...

clifton
January 13th, 2004, 04:40 PM
I heard some tracks from your latest CD, really excellent. Also I recognized your playing just by your tone and attack. Which means you've established your own sound and style, which is what it's all about. Thank you and may your music continue to grow.

JPelt
January 13th, 2004, 05:20 PM
Hey Marlin, thanks for the vote of confidence ! I'd definitely be interested in hearing any of your recordings. Thanks Noj, for the compliment.Also, thanks Clifton, I hope I can live up to all which you've described !

ebrew
January 14th, 2004, 11:30 AM
First things first Jeremy - you were right on point with Avishai Cohen's album - "The Trumpet Player".... that joint is off the hook!! I love the trumpet in a trio format... lots of space to get loose but enough structure to keep things from going buckwild. Avishai is a playa!! If anyone is considering new albums by up and coming trumpet players - get this one... AFTER you pick up "Close to My Heart" and "Insight" of course. ;) Another one to check out is Virginia Mayhew's "Phantoms" with Ingrid Jensen on trumpet. It's quartet format with trumpet, sax, bass & drums...

Glad to hear things are good on the west coast JP!! On that note, can you share some wild stories (good, bad, embarrassing, funny) from any of the gigs you have done?

Phil G -- I got your CDs in the mail a few days ago. They are next on the menu!!! I'm sure they will be as good as I anticipate. The sound bites on your website sound slick!!

JPelt
January 14th, 2004, 12:07 PM
wassup Eric,

I'm glad you dug the Avishai CD. It's raw, which is why I dig it. I've gotta check that Virginia Mayhews album out. Incidentally, have you heard Kenny Barron's "Phantom" with Wallace Roney ? That CD is Killin' ! Every band has it's stories, doesn't it ?! I remember back in September when I took "Creation" upstate to Schenectady to play a concert, and the promoter was really into the "Insight" disc ! The name of the venue was the "whisperdome" and it was located in this church with stadium seating. Because of the dome like structure of the place, the sound is so amazing that you dont even need mics. So, when I brought Creation there (we're not the quietest band, though we can be at times), all the people that came out were very surprised. And you have to keep in mind that these weren't young folks. Not saying that there's anything wrong with old folks, though. All I can say, was that the reception was lukewarm, there were people there that really dug it, and then there were more people that I get the sense didn't dig it ! Apparently, the radio station up there got a advance copy of "Close to my heart" and played it on-air to promote the concert ! So, they were expecting strings although, it was advertised that I would be up there with Creation. Oh well !! Funny... I remember thinking though, that we as a young generation of musicians oft times dont give older listeners (think 60's/70's) enough credit, and I've been guilty of this in the past ! We think, 'oh man, they're not gonna understand this'. I think it's very important to remember that we ain't doin' nothing entirely new yet ! I mean who out here on the scene now is playing something as intense as Trane was in the sixties, or Miles for that matter ? So, that puts things in perspective for me everytime I think that we're playing too loud or playing something "over their heads".. Chances are they were sitting in front of Trane, Miles or Ornette in the '60s...

ebrew
January 14th, 2004, 04:00 PM
Kenny Barron on the list... man - you have been on point so far with all your recommendations. Starting to get expensive... I totalled up all my iPod purchases over the last few months and I need to put myself on a BUDGET...

I can imagine how the folks there were caught off guard with Creation after listening to "Close to My Heart." Same thing woulda happened to me when I first heard Sonic Trance if you hadn't given me a heads up that he was branching out. Still, I dug the hell outta that stuff. My wife was a bit thrown but she got into the groove eventually. You raise a very good point with regards to listeners. I'm guessing most jazz audiences are pretty well educated or at least open to new things... still...

I'm attending a jazz master class in Feburary. I'm going to be paired up with other beginning musicians and we're going to meet twice a month under the instruction of a seasoned player. Any suggestions you can offer or things I should work on in advance?

sal
January 14th, 2004, 08:34 PM
Hey Jeremy,

First off I wanted to let you know that I finally bought a copy of Ralph Petersen's "Art of War", and I think its a phenomonal recording! Even after listening to just "Subliminal Seduction" and "Tests of Time", I had already come to the conclusion that you guys in Ralph's quintet are one of the 5 most exciting combos in jazz today, and "Art of War" only further enhanced this fact. Your playing on Portrait of Jenny is just beautiful. As a drummer myself, Ralph is exactly what I aspire to be some day....a complete player who not only holds down the beat and keeps it swinging, but who injects energy in his bandmates through his comping, giving them so much to work with while at the same time pushing them further and further to new heights. It is a fantastic band, and I hope that you guys stay together for a long time to come.

Anyways, to my question finally......Dave Douglas seems to be one of the most talked about musicans in jazz. Particularly on this board, people seem to have strong opinions about the man and his music. But he seems to be discussed just about everywhere. Some proclaim him as being a savior of jazz, constantly pushing the boundaries of the music and creating one strong, innovative album after another. Others say he's a product of hype...an overrated figure who is a mediocre player and simply a champion of the "white" jazz establishment. I was wondering if you personally like Dave's music, and what you think about all this controversy surrounding him?

JPelt
January 14th, 2004, 10:04 PM
Hey Sal, thanks for checking out "Art of War" (of which I regard to be the best of the three CD's). I'm glad you dug it !! On to Mr.Douglas. You know I must say that the media can be helpful to Jazz in particular, but most times it has an agenda. To me, it seems like the agenda in this case is to lift him up to be, as you said, the savior of Jazz. I do not agree with this sentiment. Dave has got some interesting ideas, none of which I think are groundbreaking to say the least. Personally, I think to have so many bands is confusing both to the listener and to some degree Dave. I mean if you're into that omni-directional way of thinking, then it's cool, but I like to see development (think how cohesive Miles' and Trane's band got over the years) That's what marks progress to me. I remember there was a time that I got fed up of hearing and seeing his name all over the place, to a point where I finally picked up a CD of his (which is exactly what the media and all involved was banking on) it was the one where he formed his new quintet with Chris Potter, Uri Caine, Clarence Penn, and James Genus. They said "exciting new music !" Man... that sounded just like Filles di Kilamanjaro ! Everybody sounded like they were playing a role ! And I thought to myself, I know I can sound like Miles and I've got tunes that are in that vain, but never has my music really gotten that close to a sound-a-like (in terms each cat playing a role) I say that to say that there was some big money thrown behind him to blow him up! And now, they're attempting to make him into some sort of genius ! That's the media though, I've spoken to Dave a couple of times, and I dont think that he thinks that of himself, so thats cool. That's the thing that you have to watch out for is cats that believe their hype. As an artist you cant trust the media. All you can do is continue to challenge yourself and find something new. To answer your question: I like some of Dave's music, but I dont think that it's anything necessarily new.

sheila
January 15th, 2004, 04:45 AM
What's new?

JPelt
January 15th, 2004, 10:09 AM
Well, newness (at least the way I see it) is something that is developed into after significant experiments... a new sound... a new concept...something that vehemently defies all convention. With all the music that's available to us nowadays (not just Jazz, either), it makes it that much harder to come up with something. The only thing we as musicians have is conviction. I dont think any media outlet can claim anything is new ! What do they know ? Their job is to sell a product. New does not sell (right away anyhow !)

sheila
January 29th, 2004, 05:28 AM
I just heard from a friend of mine that there's a chance that Louis Hayes Quintet will tour Europe in July with you and Vincent Herring in the line up, doing the Cannonball tribute. I would love that. Do you know if it's or when it - hopefully - will be settled?

JPelt
January 29th, 2004, 08:08 AM
Hey Sheila,

I think we'll be in Finland for the Jazz festival July 20-25, but I'm not sure I'll be able to make it, since I've got other commitments..We'll have to see..

montg
February 12th, 2004, 06:31 PM
First off I wanted to let you know that I finally bought a copy of Ralph Petersen's "Art of War", and I think its a phenomonal recording

I just picked this up too and second the sentiment--great stuff!

One thing I've noticed is that "newness" tends to be confused with surface things--like instrumentation (electric or whatever) or song material (covering Nirvana etc). But, if I follow, "newness" is something much deeper--it comes from personal convictions and working out concepts and ideas that reflect those convictions.

ANyway, I love "Art of War" and hope that there's at least one more quintent album.

sal
February 13th, 2004, 08:47 AM
Originally posted by montg
and hope that there's at least one more quintent album.

AT LEAST one more! Personally, I'd like to see about 8 or 9 more! :D

JPelt
February 16th, 2004, 06:40 PM
Hey Sal & Montg, Thanks for checking out the CD's... Montg, you are so right with your assesment of what "new" is ! That's really all I'm trying to do ! As for the RP Quintet, you might as well relish the 3 CD's that are out now ! "Tests of time" represents the last of the Ralph Peterson Quintet ! Orrin has left, and I'm pretty sure Eric Revis is real busy with Branford (though I dont know if he's officially resigned from RPQ). As for me, Ralph has decided to start another band, a sextet, and from what I hear, it's going to have a great new up-and-coming (I cant believe I've been on the scene that long that I'm calling someone else an "up-and-comer" !) trumpeter named Sean Jones, and his girlfriend on alto sax Tia. As for the third horn, it may be Jimmy or it may not ! Just so you know, the core of this decision came from the fact that when you play with Ralph, he automatically thinks that you should use him on ALL of your projects ! and when you don't then he feels as though he's been wronged.. That's the story of his life, and if you asked him, he'll tell you the same thing... the only problem is that all through his career, he's burned a lot of bridges with his behavior and thus made it damn near impossible for him to work anywhere without someone having reservations ! So, if you're asking why there'll be no 4th quintet album, it's because I used Lewis Nash on my last record (which wasn't a statement by any means. I just love the way Lewis plays, just like I loved the way Ralph played on my first TWO records !). If you dont see Jimmy, dont be surprised ! It's because, he used 'Tain on his upcoming CD on Criss Cross !!

There you have it.

bubber
February 17th, 2004, 02:27 AM
Does this (leaving RPQ) mean that the it's more probable you'll play Pori with Louis Hayes in July?

JPelt
February 17th, 2004, 07:33 AM
Well, that wasn't the commitment problem I had. I'm still working on making it though..

jordan
February 18th, 2004, 10:33 AM
Hi Jeremy, I love Art of War & your playing on it. Have you listened to any New Orleans brass bands, like Rebirth, New Birth, Lil' Stooges, etc.? Most of my favorite trumpet players are from that scene (Derrick Shezbie, Leroy Jones, Trombone Shorty), it just seems like the really get to the heart of what's important, the fire or whatever you want to call it, and the big sound.

JPelt
February 22nd, 2004, 08:06 AM
Y'know, I really have never checked out any New Orleans brass bands. I should though. What's Derrick Shezzbie been up to ? As for Wayne's record, it'll be out in April and it's called Intuition. It features, myself, Rick Germanson on piano, Gerald Cannon- bass, and Ralph Peterson.. I dug the record. Wally's was the greatest when I was there ! Matter of fact, I'll visit Wally's when I go there this weekend..

Kevin Bresnahan
February 22nd, 2004, 10:05 AM
Jeremy, see you Saturday night at the Regattabar when you play with the MBB.

BTW, I'm wondering if we may be in for a "special treat" at the Saturday night show. Many are aware that Elvis Costello sang a few tunes on the latest MBB disc, "Tonight at Noon". Well, Elvis has a gig in Boston Friday night. Any chance you guys could convince him to stay over an extra night for a guest appearance? On top of that, if you and can publicize it just a teeny bit, the place will be packed... which can only be good for the band.

So, any idea if this might take place?

I'm there for both sets either way!:D

Oh yeah, one other thing... Do you have any of your live gigs on CD-R? If you did and brought some to the MBB shows, I'd be up for buying a few. I love buying artist-produced discs. I know you're getting almost 100% of the money when I buy them and I like supporting the artist.

Later,
Kevin

makpjazz57
February 22nd, 2004, 10:51 AM
Hey Jeremy,

I've been to the Whisperdome a couple of times. The promoter/founder of the "A Place for Jazz" series is a great guy; true jazz fan, as you already know. His audience is primarily comprised of a good deal of 9 - 5ers and probably the age group around 40 - 70 and perhaps older! So, yeah, a crowd serious about jazz, but probably not as open to a lot beyond straight ahead jazz. I love the place and the promoter - great that he's bringing live jazz to the Schnectedy, NY community.

Hope to hear you Friday night (and maybe Saturday, too) at the Regattabar. I hear Jaleel might be bringing up a rough mix of his new CD???

Regards,
Marla

JPelt
February 22nd, 2004, 04:45 PM
Hey Kevin,

I dont know what Sue Mingus has in store...If he did show up, it would be a surprise to me..As for the CD-R, I dont have any for sale, you could always download the live performances off my website..Hey Marla, I dont know if Jaleel will be bringing up his CD or not.. we'll see on Friday.

jordan
February 24th, 2004, 11:34 AM
Derek Shezbie (Khabuki) is the main trumpet player for Rebirth Brass Band, although I've seen him on some Lil' Rascals Brass Band gigs and some others every now and then. I've seriously never heard a louder trumpet player.

montg
February 24th, 2004, 07:53 PM
[QUOTE]for the RP Quintet, you might as well relish the 3 CD's that are out now ! "Tests of time" represents the last of the Ralph Peterson Quintet


Sorry to hear this--but I guess these things are inevitable. Any word yet about when you might be in the studio again with your own band...Are you going to record with the Creation band?

The Escoffery CD sounds interesting--thanks for the heads up!

JPelt
February 24th, 2004, 08:03 PM
Hopefully, I'll be in the studio by the summer. The next CD that will be out will be Creation !

ebrew
April 14th, 2004, 03:10 PM
Hey Jeremy! You've been quiet lately... I'm guessing you're in Europe knocking everyone's socks off. Hit us and let us know how that gig is going.

Peace.

Valerie
April 14th, 2004, 03:37 PM
Originally posted by ebrew
Hey Jeremy! You've been quiet lately... I'm guessing you're in Europe knocking everyone's socks off. Hit us and let us know how that gig is going.

Peace.

Well, I can vouch for the fact that Jeremy was "knocking some socks off" with the Newport All-Stars at a concert recently at UCLA. He was wonderful!

JPelt
April 15th, 2004, 01:28 AM
Hey There... It's been so long since I've been on this thread, I thought they discontinued it ! Anyhow, ebrew, you are correct. I'm in Europe on my first tour as a leader. Primarily, I'm in Germany, though at the moment I'm in Switzerland. The last dates are in Austria and then I come home. It was nice to meet you at UCLA, Valerie ! Hope all is well..

bubber
May 19th, 2004, 04:48 PM
Hey Sheila,

I think we'll be in Finland for the Jazz festival July 20-25, but I'm not sure I'll be able to make it, since I've got other commitments..We'll have to see..

I see the band is listed on the Pori program, so I hope that means you found you're able to make it?

Any other dates in Europe before or after Pori for this group?

jazzmessenger
September 11th, 2004, 09:19 AM
Not sure if the thread is still active... But I just want to say you sounded AMAZING at the Detroit Jazz Festival last weekend. I have heard about you from this thread and others, but I have never heard your play (live nor CD) until last week. I will be getting your CDs very soon!!!!

jazzmessenger
September 11th, 2004, 09:21 AM
BTW, I took some photos at the festival (I work for some other jazz website). I will post some here when they are ready.

ebrew
September 11th, 2004, 09:22 AM
I'm glad someone jumped on this thread again. I did notice that Jeremy's website has gone through some changes -- perhaps he can update us on any new projects he has been working on. Did you get Creation in the studio yet?

YCMCCOY
October 9th, 2005, 11:20 PM
Hi Jeremy I Have That Album By Donald Byrd And Clare Fischer September Afternoon. I Introduced My Son To It When He Was 14yrs Old. He Is Also A Trumpet Player.

mike schwartz
November 5th, 2005, 06:28 PM
Jeremy,

Would you care to leave some impressions of the Clifford Brown 75 Birthday celebration gig at Yoshi's last week?

It looked like everyone was having the best of times.
The set I caught you seemed to be particularly digging the approach of emcee extaordinaire and tenor saxophonist/composer Benny Golson. It was the 2nd set Thursday when Sandoval came to the club straight from the airport.

I look forward to seeing your band hit there in February '06!

Best;
Mike Schwartz
KSJS, San Jose/www.ksjs.org

Fender Rhodes Freak
March 12th, 2006, 07:03 PM
Of what I've heard from him, Jeremy Pelt sounds a lot like Miles in his use of space.

richsak
April 10th, 2007, 02:04 PM
I first heard Jeremy play back when he was in junior high. He was by far the best musician in the orchestra. He was so good that at a concert the teacher wanted him to stand up, while the rest of the orchestra sat so that he would get noticed. I also saw him play in Los Angeles and he remembered me from our junior high days, depsite the fact that he hadn't seen me in years.

What makes him so great, besides his musical talent, is that he is very down to earth and is happy to meet his fans. If you ever get a chance to meet him be sure to bring your CD's along because he will probably be more than happy to sign them for you.

Carvin Abuser
October 29th, 2007, 03:21 PM
I like his playing, it reminds me a lot of Woody Shaw.

Can anyone recommend some albums that he plays on? Thanks

bhodaway10
March 4th, 2008, 05:19 PM
Jeremy,

I became a huge fan of yours after purchasing the Identity Record. I absolutely love it and the interplay with you and your band!!

I also love the Sirius Satelite show as well - love the version of 502 Blues w/ strings.

BTW, I've been trying to transcribe "Re-Invention" and I've gotten down the melody but I'm confused at the changes. Do you think you could help me figure them out?

Thanks!

Brian

mcohen777
March 23rd, 2008, 06:42 PM
Hey, Jeremy was my instructor at Litchfield Jazz Camp last year. You really helped me out a lot that week, thanks


-Matt