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jazzcritic
September 15th, 2004, 02:47 PM
Back in 1978, I recorded most (not all) of the live broadcast of the White House Jazz Festival, held on the lawn. George Wein put it together, artists and songs included:

White House Jazz Festival, June 18, 1978

1. Boogie Woogie Beguine
2. Memories of You
3. St. Louis Blues
4. History of Jazz
5. In a Mellow Tone
6. Oh, Lady Be Good!
7. Sonnymoon For Two
8. Caravan
9. How High the Moon
10. Georgia on My Mind
11. Lush Life
12. In the Good Old Summertime
13. Flying Home
14. Salt Peanuts

Eubie Blake/piano (1-2)
Katherine Handy Lewis/vocals (3)
Dick Hyman/piano (3)
Doc Cheatham/trumpet (3)
Milt Hinton/bass (3, 5-6)
Mary Lou Williams/piano (4)
Roy Eldridge/trumpet (5-6)
Clark Terry/trumpet (5-6)
Benny Carter/alto sax (5-6)
Illinois Jacquet/tenor sax(5-6)
Teddy Wilson/piano (5-6)
Jo Jones/drums (5-6)
Sonny Rollins/tenor sax (7)
McCoy Tyner/piano (7)
Ron Carter/bass (7, 8?)
Dexter Gordon/tenor sax (8)
Herbie Hancock/piano (8)
Lionel Hampton (9-13)
Chick Corea/piano (9-13)
Ray Brown/bass (9-13)
Stan Getz/tenor sax (9-13) probably the lone reed soloist on 11
Zoot Sims/tenor sax (9-13)
George Benson/electric guitar (9-13)
Louis Bellson/drums (9-13)
Gerry Mulligan/clarinet/emcee (9-13)
Pearl Bailey/vocals (12)
Dizzy Gillespie/trumpet (8?, 13)
Max Roach/drums (7, 8?, 13)
President Jimmy Carter/vocals (13)
George Wein/producer/emcee

Specifically I'm looking for a complete playlist and personnel list. Cecil Taylor did an unaccompanied untitled solo, while I am positive that Herbie Hancock & Dexter Gordon played a second number. Research on the web has not been fruitful.

Any help is appreciated.

Valerie
September 15th, 2004, 03:28 PM
i'm going to try to find out for you. actually herbie is in japan so i don't know when i'll speak with him. wish i could ask my father who was there but he left us years ago. maybe someone else will be able to get the info faster than i will, but i'll try anyway.

clave
September 15th, 2004, 03:39 PM
This info. should be available via the White House Historical Association; also (probably) via the National Archives.

Pete B
September 15th, 2004, 05:51 PM
Ken - I did some research on this awhile back. No playlist, but it does somehwat address your question on personnel, and provides some nice background.Here's what I came up with:

Jimmy Carter's administration was responsible for creating the first large-scale jazz production on the White House's South Lawn. This event, which marked the 25th Anniversary of the Newport Jazz festival, included 800 guests and over 50 jazz musicians. Although jazz had been an important American art form for more than half a century, President Carter's public identification of jazz was deeply significant.
James Carter 1977-1981
Invited to the 25th anniversary celebration of the Newport Jazz Festival , 6/18/78
*Indicates performers at the Anniversary Festival Celebration
Eubie Blake *
Ornette Coleman*
Mary Lou Williams*
Stan Getz*
Dizzy Gillespie*
Lionel Hampton*
Herbie Hancock*
Papa Joe Jones*
Katherine Handy Lewis*
Max Roach*
Sonny Rollins*
Cecil Taylor*
Cecil Taylor*
Clark Terry*
Ray Brown
Benny Carter
'Lil Jazz Eldridge
Dexter Gordon
Milt Hinton
John Lewis
Charles Mingus
Gerry Mulligan
George Russell
Billy Taylor
McCoy Tyner
Teddy Wilson

http://www.gwu.edu/~jazz/contactus.html

Years later, toward the end of his presidency, Jimmy Carter held a jazz festival on a lawn of the White House. It wasn't one of those "star" performances at a state dinner, or the kind of honors ceremony at which Richard Nixon had the chutzpah to play a two-piano duet with the ever-gracious Duke Ellington.
Carter was a jazz fan. In his introduction, he told of how he had, before becoming an eminence, frequented jazz clubs, and he said something no other president had said before: jazz did not have the stature it deserved in its native land because of the racism here.
George Wein had orchestrated an intriguing sequence of performers-from Eubie Blake to Max Roach and Dizzy Gillespie. At the end, Dizzy cajoled the president to sing the "Salt Peanuts" refrain as he and Max accompanied the chief executive on that bop anthem.
A number of cabinet members were in the front seats throughout the concert. One of them, listening impassively, was Attorney General Griffin Bell, in private life a powerful Atlanta attorney, who for years since has been a partner in one of the most successful law firms in the country, and a sometime presidential adviser.
When Cecil started his set, Bell leaned forward and became immobile, fixing his attention on the kinetic pianist. When Cecil hit the last thunderous notes, he made one of his high-speed exits, rushing into the shrubbery. The Attorney General leapt off his seat and chased Cecil until he cornered him.
Later, I asked Cecil, "What the hell did he want?"
"He wanted," Cecil said matter-of-factly, "to know where he could get some of my records."
Throughout his life in jazz, Cecil continues to spellbind or infuriate listeners. As I recalled in Jazz Is, "After a Cecil Taylor concert in California at which 3,000 people gave him standing ovations several times during the course of the performance, the distinguished [late] Los Angeles critic Leonard Feather declared that 'anyone working with a jackhammer could have achieved the same results.'"
(Nat Hentoff http://jazztimes.com/home.cfm?URL=http://jazztimes.com/final_chorus/finalchorus_ceciltaylor.cfm? )

clave
September 15th, 2004, 08:45 PM
Ken,

Another suggestion: the Carter library. I would bet money that someone noted down the playlist -- all presidential dinners, concerts, etc. are a matter of public record/history, and as such, information about them is archived. (That didn't beome a big deal until the late 20h century, though.)

You should be able to find this material somewhere or other -- as with most D.C.-related stuff, it will probably take patience and persistence to get all the material you're looking for. That said, I think your efforts will pay off in the end.

Pete B
September 16th, 2004, 07:27 AM
As I remember, when I was researching it, there was material in the Carter Library, however it was not available online and I didn't pursue it further. I would imagine that an archivist there would be able to help you out.

tpt1
September 16th, 2004, 10:53 AM
i'm going to try to find out for you. actually herbie is in japan so i don't know when i'll speak with him. wish i could ask my father who was there but he left us years ago. maybe someone else will be able to get the info faster than i will, but i'll try anyway.

Valerie, I'm curious. Who was your father? And, how do you know Herbie Hancock personally? He is one of my all-time favorite musicians. Of course, I love his piano playing and his sense of adventure in music -- not afraid to try new and different things.

clave
September 16th, 2004, 11:07 AM
As I remember, when I was researching it, there was material in the Carter Library, however it was not available online and I didn't pursue it further. I would imagine that an archivist there would be able to help you out.

No, most of this kind of material isn't online, but it can be gotten via US mail!

jazzcritic
September 16th, 2004, 11:21 AM
Thanks for all of the replies. I'll probably stop by the Carter Library during my next trip to Atlanta. It's on the way to a great used record store, Wax 'N Facts.

When I get a complete list of songs, I'll post it. I have recordings of all music
listed in my initial post in this thread.

Valerie
September 16th, 2004, 12:43 PM
Valerie, I'm curious. Who was your father? And, how do you know Herbie Hancock personally? He is one of my all-time favorite musicians. Of course, I love his piano playing and his sense of adventure in music -- not afraid to try new and different things.

If you're thinking my father was some famous musician, I'm afraid I'll have to disappoint you! LOL!! He was an advertising/publicity/PR guy who worked with George Wein and Storyville/Newport Jazz Festival from its inception.

Herbie and his wife have been my friends since our NYC days in the 60s. That's my story, tpt1, and I'm stickin' to it!!

tpt1
September 16th, 2004, 01:09 PM
If you're thinking my father was some famous musician, I'm afraid I'll have to disappoint you! LOL!! He was an advertising/publicity/PR guy who worked with George Wein and Storyville/Newport Jazz Festival from its inception.
No disappointment at all! My brother is also a PR guy, currently working for Jazz at Lincoln Center. He knows George Wein and got me a signed copy of his recent biography, which I have enjoyed reading.

Herbie and his wife have been my friends since our NYC days in the 60s. That's my story, tpt1, and I'm stickin' to it!!
And a good story it is. Herbie is one person I would like to meet someday. He has inspired me for many years.

Thanks for the reply.

Valerie
September 16th, 2004, 01:52 PM
Herbie is one person I would like to meet someday. He has inspired me for many years.



Well, since you're in NYC, there shouldn't be much of a problem in meeting him as he plays/works there fairly often. He almost always works at the Blue Note around the holidays.

tpt1
September 16th, 2004, 04:32 PM
Well, since you're in NYC, there shouldn't be much of a problem in meeting him as he plays/works there fairly often. He almost always works at the Blue Note around the holidays.

Yeah, I've seen him play here many times, but mostly at JVC concerts. I will try to make it to the Blue Note next time he plays there. Thanks.