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Thread: Australian Jazz Korner

  1. #141
    Not Dead kenny weir's Avatar
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    Melbourne International Jazz Festival

    Whew - just back from a week's leave and here I am right back in the thick of it!

    Here's the piece I wrote today to go with the liftout program that's going in Sunday's paper as part of our sponsorship deal with the festival:

    THE Sunday Herald Sun is proud to continue its association with the Melbourne International Jazz Festival, which this year more than ever reflects the robust health of our city's jazz scene.

    From traditional styles to edgy experimentation, almost every aspect of the music that makes Melbourne's Australia's leading jazz city is represented in the festival's program.

    Given that about 75 per cent of the featured artists work regularly in and around Melbourne, those music fans with broad tastes but only a casual interest in jazz may wonder why they should attend festival shows when they can catch many of the performers whenever they please.

    The answer lies in the special care and preparation the artists bring to their festival performances.

    The faces may be familiar but often the band configurations and repertoires are assembled especially for the festival.

    Of course, one of the long-term aims of the festival is to foster regular attendance at Melbourne's many venues.

    Nothing would make the festival staff and board, artistic director Adrian Jackson, the promoters and venues happier than to have festival patrons so enjoy the festival that they return for more on a regular basis.

    Despite the prominence given to Melbourne musicians, the 2004 festival program features a number of international acts.

    Among the most alluring will be the shows featuring New York-based saxophonist Tim Ries.

    Tim has parlayed his on-the-road experiences with the Rolling Stones into a forthcoming album of classics from the Stones' songbook.

    But any suspicions his festival gigs may feature any sort of lame jazz rock can be dismissed with the knowledge he is bringing with him players the stature of guitarist Ben Monder and drummer Billy Drummond.

    Tim's band for his shows at Bennetts Lane and Malvern Town Hall will be completed by Sydney bassist Jonathan Zwartz and Melbourne pianist Aaron Choulai, both of whom he jammed with while in Australia with the Stones.

    Another international festival guest will be Canadian trombonist, pianist and composer Hugh Fraser, whose quintet will be joined by Melbourne's Fiona Burnett (saxophone) and Peter Knight (flugelhorn).

    Joining Ries and Fraser on the festival's international roster will be Cuban trumpeter Luis Valle; Tony Haynes (leading an Australian edition of his Grand Union Orchestra); famed vocalist Mark Murphy; the Pascal Schumacher Quartet from Belgium/Luxembourg; another Canadian outfit, the Quinsin Nachoff Quartet; and New Zealand drumming legend Frank Gibson Jr.

    The depth of Melbourne and Australian talent at the festival is broad, deep and breathtaking.

    Among those proving the everlasting relevance of the sounds and styles of the early days of jazz will be the Graeme Bell Reunion Band; a tribute to Jelly Roll Morton by Dick Hughes (piano) and a trio of Allan Browne (drums), John McCarthy (clarinet) and Stephen Grant (piano); and the jazz dance presented by the Victorian Jazz Club.

    A festival highlight is sure to be provided by pianist/composer Paul Grabowsky, who will perform music from his latest album, Tales of Time and Space.

    Paul took spectacular trumpeter Scott Tinkler with him to New York to record the album with the likes of Jeff "Tain'' Watts, Joe Lovano and Branford Marsalis.

    Paul and Scott will be joined for their Malvern Town Hall Show by Julien Wilson (saxophones), Philip Rex (bass) and Simon Barker (drums).

    Straightahead, swinging jazz of the highest order and diversity will be provided throughout the festival by Joe Chindamo, James Morrison, Bob Sedergreen, Vince Jones, Dale Barlow, Gil Askey, Wilbur Wilde, George Washingmachine and many more.

    Singers are always among the most popular drawcardsat any jazz festival, and in this regard the 2004 MIJF offers riches aplenty, including performances by Vince Jones, Christine Sullivan, Yvette Johansson, Janet Seidel, Nina Ferro, Judy Jacques, Joy Yates, Michelle Nicolle, Alison Wedding, White With Two, Julie O'Hara, Emma Gilmartin, Martin Breeze, Emma Franz, Kerri Simpson, Axle Whitehead, Nichaud Fitzgibbon and Sunny Koll.

    If anything, the festival offers even more to those looking for a music that works the wild side of the street - jazz of the now and the future, improvised music that is often a joyous adventure into the unknown.

    The folks from Half Bent, who have presented their own festivals of edgy sounds, will present Sunday afternoon shows at Trades Hall with Spike Mason's Oximetric and the Cameron Deyell-Matt Keeghan Band, and Misinterprotato and Adam Simmons' Toy Band.

    And at Wesley Anne in Northcote, Half Bent will present four shows, each featuring a soloist, a duo and a trio.

    Adding to the festival's seat-of-the-pants excitement will be Brunswick St performances by the Make It Up Club at BarOpen and the likes of Scott Tinkler and Julien Wilson at the Cape Lounge.

    And where else, except at the Melbourne International Jazz Festival, could you hear Brisbane-based American expatriate Erik Griswold wreak reverant havoc on the music of Thelonious Monk while playing prepared piano with such brilliant and like-minded spirits as Tim O'Dwyer (saxophones), Mark Shepherd (bass) and Danny Fischer (drums)?

    Kenny Weir presents The Pearls every Monday between8-10pm on PBS (106.7 FM).

    http://www.mijf.org/

  2. #142
    Not Dead kenny weir's Avatar
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    Re: Australian jazz musicians performing overseas

    Originally posted by Big Fun
    Kenny,

    I am new in here. I have never been to Australia but should go there in the near future.

    I live in Hong Kong and happened to see some of the best Austrailian jazz musicians performing in town:

    Anton Delecca
    Mark Fitzgibbon
    Blaine Whittaker
    Mark Issacs
    Dale Barlow
    Simon Barker
    Big Fun: You may not be so lucky as me - getting to see these sort of characters on a pretty much hometown basis - but you're doing OK.

    At any given time it seems there's about a half-dozen or Australian players performing in Asia, from Japan on down.

    Where do you these cats? In jazz clubs, bars, concerts?

  3. #143
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    HOT GIG ALERT

    This Thursday past I caught a corker at Bennetts Lane.

    It was the debut gig by a new Melbourne band called Gonebanda.

    Gianni Marinucci (trumpet/cornet)
    Ronny Ferella (drums/melodica)
    Nick Freer (guitar)
    Howard Cairns (bass/sousaphone)

    I caught the last two tunes of the first set and all of the second.

    The band's music is inspired by the Italian heritage shared by both Gianucci and Ferella, with most of it being original or heavily reworked material drawn from their family experiences.

    It was all simply marvellous, ranging from strutting march-style tunes to more pastoral ballad-type stuff. There were sublime delicate moments and others of rugged intensity.

    The Italian feel was pronounced yet the blending of the two worlds was one of great flare and individuality. It was very inspiring.

    I'd say there would be very few places in the world where the marriage of Italian culture and jazz would result in such strikingly beautiful and original music, other than Italy itself.

    Australia's great immigration flood (including those who arrived from Italy) came mostly post-WWII, lending this sort of exercise - not to mention Australian/Italian food and coffee - a freshness and vitality.

    I know from experience that Italian food in New Orleans and San Francisco is very different from that found in Melbourne. Not better or worse, mind you, just different - in those locations the Italian influence and culture has had a lot longer to evolve and mingle.

    I have no idea if this band is to be a regular project or whether there are plans for it to record.

    Ronny is coming on my radio show on Monday to discuss MIJF gigs with which he's involved, so I plan to quiz him about Gonebanda then.

  4. #144
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    WORDS FAIL KENNY

    Keith Hounslow/Tony Gould - McJad Goes Organic (Move Records)



    Keith Hounslow - Pocket trumpet, cornet, flugelhorn
    Tony Gould - Piano, organ

    In the latest edition of The Penguin Guide To jazz On CD, there are a scattering of Australian albums. Mostly they are made up of releases on the now defunct Naxos Jazz (Mike Nock was the label's A&R guy) and Sydney's Rufus records, presumably because Tim Dunn sent the Penguins his releases.

    For the past year or so, I've been encouraging Australians to send their records to the Penguin honchos. We'll see next edition if I've had any success. I doubt there's any extra sales to be had through inclusion in that weighty tome, but I think the exposure would be invaluable.

    I have no wish to start another discussion about the Penguin guide (heaven forbid), but I can't help wondering how much they would give this amazing disc.

    (Most Australian albums in the sixth edition rate 3 stars, with a few getting 3 1/2).

    Like others here who have heard some of the recent years' brilliant releases out of Australia, I can think of quite a few that could or should snag 4 stars from those guys.

    This is one of them.

    In fact, I wouldn't be that surprised if they gave it one of their coveted crowns. It's the kind of quirky, left-field outing they occasionally go ga-ga over.

    Hounslow and Gould have been around on the Australian scene for yonks.

    The music on Hounslow's six-disc "50 Years Of Playing Jazz In Australia" features two discs of Keith talking about his career and four discs of music, from 1948 through to the '90s. (Rex Stewart even plays on one cut).

    Much of the music is in a traditional vein, but much of the later stuff is in a modern bag. In having the ability to live happily in both the modern and traditional jazz worlds, he has much in common with the late John Sangster, whose "Lord Of The Rings" epics are being reissued by Move, a little Melbourne label that also released "The Last Will And Testament Of John Sangster" last year. Gould played on that super album of Sangster compositions recorded after his death.

    Gould hasn't been around quite as long, even if he looks like he has. (Sorry, Tony!). He's about as well known for his exploits in classical music as in jazz; is head of music at the Victorian College of the Arts, which is turning out so many fine jazz musicians; and until very recently was convening judge of the National Jazz Awards, which are run each year in conjunction with the Wangaratta Festival of jazz and Blues. He has played on some very fine albums, but those are for another day.

    Hounslow and Gould formed McJad - it stands for Melbourne Contemporary Jazz Art Duo - in the late '70s, recording two albums ("Introducing McJad" and "McJad Miniatures"). According to the notes with this new release, there was no formal disbanding of the duo - they simply went their separate ways after a tour of India in 1982.

    Those first two albums are to be found on disc two of this new release/reissue.

    The first of them, "Introducing McJad", features five piano/horn duets ranging in length from five to 10 minutes.

    The second album, "McJad Miniatures", features nine shorter pieces.

    The new music ("The McJad Chroicles") - most of the first disc - has Gould playing the organ at Ormond College Chapel at the University of Melbourne. It opens with "Contrapuntal theme" and closes with "Theme Reprise". Between are "Variations 1-12". The album closes with three standards - "Basin Street Blues, "Old Folks" and "In The Wee Small Hours Of The Morning".

    Whew, sorry about the long-winded introduction!

    Now to the music.

    All of this music - new and reissued - is spontaneous improvistion (excepting, of course, the three standards listed above).

    The older stuff, recorded in 1978 and 1980, came well before my time as either an Australian resident or as a jazz fan.

    It's gobsmackingly gorgeous. It's also spooky, tranquil, bluesy, humourous, intense, exciting, magical, percussive, playful, sensuous.

    My ear is insufficiently discerning to accuately pick which horn Hounslow is playing and when, but it matters not. There's a lot of mute playing. But the greatest thing about the horn work is that it is so strikingly modern and vintage at the same time. That's hardly suprising, given his penchant for both traditonal and modern approaches to jazz, but I've rarely heard such a seamless, joyful blending of the two.

    Music that is so of the moment yet simultaneously recalls Bubber Miley and Jelly Roll Morton is something to truly treasure.

    Other reference points could be solo Keith Jarrett, Miles and Tomas Stanko.

    But really, this music is so comfortable in its own amazing world that such comparisons are almost demeaning, as are references to traditonal or modern jazz.

    The long suite (its variations form is what brings to mind Stanko and his "Soul Of Things" album) is more of the same, but also very different.

    In Gould's deft hands the church organ paints all sort of colours and rhythms. His touch makes the organ sing.

    Aside from these humble descriptions, I'm afraid words utterly fail me when it comes to this music. It's quite beyond me to capture the magic and mystery and joy this music has brought me in the week I've had this release.

    And once more I'm left pounding my head on my computer terminal in sheer frustration that so much grand Australian music is going unheard by the big, bad world.

    I fervently hope some of the regulars readers of this thread will take the plunge on this. I can't guarantee you'll dig it, but I'd be shocked if you didn't.

    http://www.move.com.au/disc.cfm/3271


  5. #145
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    Pubisher's Pick

    I just wanted to let everyone know that Australian jazz is on the front page of All About Jazz for a while. My CD Keeping the Standards is Publisher's Pick and has prime real estate on the homepage of All About Jazz.

    Meanwhile, at my own website I now have a "News" page that uses Blog software - I am posting stuff to it daily now, and Comments can be added by visitors to each individual post. Please drop by and leave a comment.
    Everything in moderation, including moderation

  6. #146
    Not Dead kenny weir's Avatar
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    Mark rocks!

  7. #147
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    Melb Avant Sax man Andy Williams is on an trans-musical collision course

    Reading about the Mijf thats coming up inspired me.... I thought I'd let the Aust Jazz Korner know about an event thats attempting to bring together musicians and visual artists who dont normally work together... Melbourne Sax player Andy Williams is part of one of the openning night's performances... Alongside other sound people from Bulgaria, the UK, and New Zealand

    heres the info

    ENViRON: a monthly event presenting a moody salad bowl of unpredictable aesthetics.

    OPENING NIGHT : SUNDAY JUNE 6 : 7PM TIL LATE : $5
    Venue: Loop 23 Meyers Place Melb city

    a potentially dangerous and mind-altering experiment mixes together the many talents of the melbourne music and visual art movements. inter-state and international guests add their own elements to the exchange, bridging different territorial and cultural traditions.

    and woven within… talula - a new performance concept - defies tradition by taking cues from installation arts, AV manipulation, jazz, dub and electronic music methodologies… through talula, artists get to know each other thru the forging of unlikely and unpredictable collaborations, in which the individual roles of each participant merge into one…

    the selector creates the sonic foundation, the freestyler reacts accordingly, the mixer treats ‘dub style’ the overall sonic concoction, and the media median generates visual life forms that inspire the whole process all over again… a feedback cycle of creativity, confrontation of ideas and complimentary collision…

    "The game show of sound clashes, the thunderdome of musical jams…Talula may change the way late night entertainment consumption is perceived from here on…" Bernard Tindall

    *Talula #1 (9pm)

    Mik laVage
    IdioSync, Thereminbass

    Andy Williams
    Melbourne, avant-sax maestro

    Paul Rodgers
    Loophole cinema UK, Wax film screened at Tate Britain

    Viktor Markov
    Channel Comm Bulgaria, SBS Radio


    *Talula #2 (11pm)

    Brendan Palmer
    Clan Analogue, EAR, Zonar, Alchemy

    Frost
    School of Emotional Engineering

    Layla Vardo
    IdioSync

    Damien Charles
    NZ, Red Eyes

    Any artists interested in being involved (as it's a very open ended concept) should goto www.environline.net

  8. #148
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    Paul Rodgers (no, not the Free singer) is one hell of a bass player! Well worth seeing.

    He doesn't so much play his bass as mate with it!

  9. #149
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    New review of my CD at All About Jazz

    All About Jazz have just published a brand new review of my new CD Keeping the Standards, the second appraisal of the CD that has appeared on the site after they recently featured it as "Publisher's Pick" on the Homepage. The new review is very in-depth and extremely positive, it's here
    Everything in moderation, including moderation

  10. #150
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    What can you tell me about pianist Aaron Choulai? I recently picked up his debut CD "Place" on the Sunnyside label (home to Luciana Souza, Kenny Barron & Chris Potter, so Aaron is keeping pretty good company). I had never heard of him, but bought the disc because he surrounded himself with five ringers, James Genus on bass, drummer Clarence Penn, an alumnus of Betty Carter University, Tim Ries on sax and one of my favorite trumpeters, Scott Wendholt.

    So, I bought the disc because of the high caliber sidemen, but Chouli didn't appear to be intimidated surrounded by such heavy hitters.

    He hails from "Down Under" and he is of Papuan, Chinese and Polish/Jewish ancestry.

  11. #151
    Not Dead kenny weir's Avatar
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    Hardbop - I've been meaning to get posting on this thread again, specifically about Aaron and his new album. So hopefully I'll get around to bit later in the day. It's an amazing story.

  12. #152
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    The Melbourne International Jazz Festival is now a fading memory, and sad to say I saw very little of the week and a half's worth of music because of family reasons.

    I understand the move from January (when the festival clashed with the Australian Open and generally seemed to suffer from a sort of post-New Year/Xmas malaise/lethargy) to May was very successful, with receipts up something like 60 per cent.

    One gig I did see and enjoy was the Bennetts Lane show by the Tim Ries Rolling Stones Project.

    Truth to tell, as intriguing and enjoyable as it was, it was pretty much a matter - for me - of the parts being greater than the sum.

    Ries will soon have an album of Rolling Stones covers - and it's an album I expect will be quite controversial. Tim was inspired to record it by the time he spent on the road with the Stones during their last world tour. Hearing tunes such as Wild Horses, Gimme Shelter and so on done in a jazz club with a crack band was interesting - shorn of their rock 'n' roll furniture, the songs - unsurprisingly - came across as standard and very good hard bop/soul jazz fodder.

    However, for the album Tim has definitely gone the superstar guest route - as well as Charlie Watts, Keith Richards, Ron Wood, guest on the CD will include Sheryl Crow, Bill Frisell, Ben Monder, Darryl Jones, John Patitucci, Jeff Ballard, Brian Blade, Clarence Penn, Michael Davis, Lisa Fischer, Bernard Fowler, Luciana Souza, Bill Charlap, Larry Goldings, Edward Simon, Chuck Leavell, Roberto DiGioia, and Mauro Refusco.

    In any case, in the comfy confines of Bennetts Lane it was fascinating to watch and hear Billy Drummond on the drums, Ben Monder on the guitar (although he appeared bored witless by this sort of material), Jonathon Zwartz on the bass and Aaron Choulai on the piano.

    Ries met, played with and hung out with the two Australians while here with the Stones.

    The show doubled as a CD launch for Choulai's debut CD, Place.

    And given this was my first live exposure to this young Melbourne musician - despite him having become a stalwart of the Melbourne scene in the past couple of years - I would've much preferred to hear his own material and gone without the Stones stuff.

    Choulai is a young (early 20s) pianist with a spectacularly diverse heritage (Papua/Chinese/Polish/Jewish/Australian).

    His album Place, is as fine a debut as any young musician could want.

    Thanks to the efforts of Tim Ries, and like Paul Grabwosky's Tales OF Time And Space, the Choulai album is very much a New York/Melbourne project.

    As well as Ries, the album features Scott Wendholt (trumpet), James Genus (bass) and Clarence Penn (drums). Also thanks to Ries, the album has received US release on the Sunnyside Records label (it's out on Move Records in Australia).

    The album is post-hop of a high class. Choulai's compositions are the perfect foil for such a talented crew.

    I have but two minor reservations about the album.

    1. Unlike Grabowsky, who wrote the notes for the album, Choulai is a musical force still finding its feet. The more mature Grabowsky was easily able to harness the likes of Joe Lovano and Branford Marsalis to his own ends. Place, by contrast, sounds more like a collegiate project.

    2. With its two-horn front-line and inevitable echoes of the Blue Note '60s sound, Place has to be understood as being just part of what Aaron Choulai is about. He performs with his own band Vada and just a few weeks ago performed a Melbourne Jazz Co-op gig at Bennetts Lane with trumpeter Eugene Ball, a drummer and a string quartet.

    It will be fascinating to see where and how this fantastic jazz talent evolves.


  13. #153
    Not Dead kenny weir's Avatar
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    Other News From Australia

    The biggest news is the departure of Adrian Jackson from his role as artistic director of the Melbourne International Jazz Festival, although he will stay on as a judge of the Bell Awards, which will be announced on August 25.

    In a post at ozjazzfourm - http://gracemusic.proboards26.com/in...num=1086654069 - Adrian writes:

    "Thanks for your interest, yes I have resigned as AD for MIJF. Basically, it was increasingly difficult to juggle the demands of that job & the demands of working as AD for Wangaratta. The timelines overlap too often, you have to concentrate 100% on one when you should also be doing the same for the other. So I think it will be in the interests of both MIJF and myself if I bow out, and just concentrate on Wangaratta. Whoever takes over as AD for MIJF, I am sure they will find the Board & the executive officer will give them 100% support."

    ******

    New releases:

    Stephen Magnusson/Frank Di Sario - Boundaries (Newmarket)
    Tim Wilson Trio - Sorrym, Pardon, What (Newmarket)
    Andy Vance Trio - Lost In Space (Newmarket)
    Jenny Game Ensemble - Jacinta's Song (Newmarket)

  14. #154
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    Bells Bell

    Just received from our Kenny

    .......the John Bell Trio " Spiral", one spin through only so far. Now whilst I like vibes I can't see vibes trio replacing piano trios in the scheme of things...however....this record from 2000 is something else.

    I love it mucho. For a trio of vibes/bass/ drums the sound is surpringly varied ( there is some doubling on maraca and melodica) Bell floats over the bars and plays melodic lines just inside of out and is propelled along by a varied groove from drummer Ronny Ferella. Like so much of the jazz I really enjoy there is a hint of rock "Orbit" has subtle shuffle groove that's a treat.

    I dont wanna gush too much too early but this is a very fine disc indeed.

    more thoughts later

    thanks kenny
    Adrian

  15. #155
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    Hey Adrian glad you like it. What I find interesting about the album - escpecially after talking to drummer Ronny Ferella about it - is that I suspect the music veers into outside territory that could usually make me uncomfortable, but the melifluous nature of the vibes and the groove momentum of Ronny and bassist Frank di Sario carries the day and more.

  16. #156
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    At first I thought bassist Frank di Sario wasn't doing much but he gives a edge of grunge to the proceeding, a throbbing bass whilst the drummer skitters around and Bell hovers and drops bombs. This is really lovely stuff, memorable tunes you could put words to. Clearly some soul influences there, nice.....
    Adrian

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    Oz Fest: Parrott Sisters at Sweet Rhythm

    Hi...saw a great gig at sweet rhythm in NYC with parrott sisters and cathy harley....last month...their cd awabakal suite is a great listen.....see my thoughts at....http://www.allaboutjazz.com/php/article.php?id=2028

    thanx...Elliott

  18. #158
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    Re : Jame Muller

    Quote Originally Posted by kenny weir
    Frankly, I don’t think there’s a jazz guitarist who can match him at the moment – anywhere in the world – for not just chops and technique, but also for great tunes and a finely-honed, tasty sense of dynamics.
    An interesting story. I had the pleasure of playing with James when I (and he) lived in Adelaide a few years back.

    The first time I heard him play was at a rehearsal. He sat in the corner while we rehearsed and then got up and sat in with us for a tune or two at the end. He was seventeen and it was scary.

    Whilst I (like most of my peers at the time) were immediately blown away by his technique, it didn't take long to realise that not only was he so incredibly musical and exciting to listen to, but he also had his own voice. Sure the influences were there loud and clear, but you just knew he was going to take it away into his own thing.

    I remember him sitting in with a group I led in Adelaide one night and thinking "One day I'll have this guy's records in my collection, and it won't be because there a mate's albums, it will be because they are bloody brilliant."

    I totally agree with Kenny's comments. This is not an over statment. He really is that good.

    Simon Rigby

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    Mike Nock

    Can anyone tell me the best place to find Mike Nock's live BigSmallBand disk in the US? The cost of shipping from Australia on the Aussie websites I've visited seems a little steep for my taste. I'd love some advice!

    L.

    Louis Schwartz

  20. #160
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louis Schwartz
    Can anyone tell me the best place to find Mike Nock's live BigSmallBand disk in the US? The cost of shipping from Australia on the Aussie websites I've visited seems a little steep for my taste. I'd love some advice!

    L.
    Louis - let me get back to you in a few days.

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