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Thread: All Things Anthony Braxton!!!

  1. #196
    Registered User freeform73's Avatar
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    Just reading this



    a good hint to enter his music and thoughts.
    http://completecommunion.blogspot.com/
    http://completecommunion.podomatic.com/

  2. #197
    Registered User xybert's Avatar
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    ^^^ Just read that myself not too long ago.

    It's a really fun read. It's really fun traveling along with the band on their tour; i imagine even non fans would find it to be an enjoyable read. The interview sections are indeed illuminating, although i will admit to skimming through the more dedicated 'technical' section at the end; just found it too dense although i have every intention of revisiting it. I found the technical/theory parts peppered throughout the road trip and conversations with Graham Lock more bite sized and therefore easier to digest.

  3. #198
    Registered User freeform73's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xybert View Post
    ^^^ Just read that myself not too long ago.

    It's a really fun read. It's really fun traveling along with the band on their tour; i imagine even non fans would find it to be an enjoyable read. The interview sections are indeed illuminating, although i will admit to skimming through the more dedicated 'technical' section at the end; just found it too dense although i have every intention of revisiting it. I found the technical/theory parts peppered throughout the road trip and conversations with Graham Lock more bite sized and therefore easier to digest.
    Agree, I'm enjoying these discussions about music and theoric expositions ... great insight on Braxton's thoughts and life behind his music ... Me too, I will read again those pages in time, for sure ... my love and admiration for this music, and for the man, is still growing.
    http://completecommunion.blogspot.com/
    http://completecommunion.podomatic.com/

  4. #199
    Distracted dsschicago's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brijazz123 View Post
    Braxton's tricentricfoundation site has a number of "bootleg" recordings of Braxton in various configurations, available for free download:

    http://tricentricfoundation.org/bootlegs

    Some nice stuff here, with good quality.
    That whole site is really decent. I like the subscription service they have, what is it, you pay twelve bucks a month and get two free album downloads and all kinds of other access. I'd like other musicians to take a hint from Braxton's site. Very nicely done.

  5. #200
    Administrator Justin V's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dsschicago View Post
    That whole site is really decent. I like the subscription service they have, what is it, you pay twelve bucks a month and get two free album downloads and all kinds of other access. I'd like other musicians to take a hint from Braxton's site. Very nicely done.
    It's actually $13 (or, $12+1, as his site puts it). I've downloaded the current featured free download, which is a septet set from 2008. I'm kicking myself for not making that concert. I wasn't even aware that Braxton played all of those gigs in Pittsburgh in 2008. Manchester Craftsmen's Guild, where the septet concert was recorded, normally has a ton of vocalists and smooth jazz acts, but has also recently had people like the Heath Brothers and McCoy Tyner.

    As someone with a limited music budget who doesn't illegally download, I love it when musicians have music available for free download. In Braxton's case, he has such an immense discography that it's difficult to know what to buy. I only have two other Braxton albums, but I could see myself subscribing in order to further explore his music.

    EDIT: I just read on Braxton's wikipedia page that he used to be a professional chess hustler. I'm not sure whether that's true, but I wouldn't be surprised.
    When I grow up, I want to be like Roy Haynes.

  6. #201
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    Anthony Braxton recent activities

    From October 5th to 8th, Anthony Braxton and his Tri-Centric Foundation held a 4-day festival of his music at Roulette (Brooklyn, NY) which brought many world and U.S. premieres to the public, including the concert reading of two acts from his most recent opera, Trillium J.

    Some photos and video clips from the Tri-Centric festival can be found on the Tri-Centric Foundation Facebook page
    http://www.facebook.com/tricentricfoundation

    Relating to the event, as well as the release of his first studio-recorded opera Trillium E, Anthony was recently interviewed on NPR by Howard Mandel:
    http://www.npr.org/2011/10/15/141365...y-experiencers

    This NPR interview offers fascinating insight into Anthony's musical process, as told by the composer himself.

    He was also featured in an article by Nate Chinen in The New York Times:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/05/ar...xton.html?_r=2

    Trillium E was released on Oct.11, 2011 and is now available from Tri-Centric Foundation's New Braxton House label as a 4 CD box set + download:
    http://tricentricfoundation.org/label/albums/68
    or download only:
    http://tricentricfoundation.org/label/albums/69
    and a free sampler spanning three decades of his music is available here:
    http://tricentricfoundation.org/label/albums/65


    Best Wishes,

    Kyoko Kitamura
    Tri-Centric Foundation
    http://tricentricfoundation.org/
    http://www.facebook.com/tricentricfoundation
    http://twitter.com/tricentricfdn
    http://anthonybraxton.wordpress.com/

  7. #202
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    Anthony Braxton's TCO blog is back!

    The Tri-Centric Orchestra blog, which features members of Anthony Braxton's Tri-Centric Orchestra, is back after a short hiatus (we took some time off for the the Braxton Festival).

    Featured now is frequent Braxton collaborator, bassist Carl Testa. He currently works with the Anthony Braxton Septet and the 12+(1,2,3)tet, and you might have heard him at the Braxton festival or on Trillium E. And he runs the The Uncertainty Music Series in Connecticut. His favorite Braxton quote? That “the challenge of creativity [...] is to move towards the greatest thought you can think of.”

    More here: http://anthonybraxton.wordpress.com/...le-carl-testa/

    Best Wishes,

    Kyoko Kitamura
    Tri-Centric Foundation
    http://tricentricfoundation.org/
    http://www.facebook.com/tricentricfoundation
    http://twitter.com/tricentricfdn
    http://anthonybraxton.wordpress.com/

  8. #203
    Registered User gregk's Avatar
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    Trillum E

    I don't like opera, but I do like just about everything Braxton. Am I going to like Trillium E? Do I want this set?

  9. #204
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    If you have not download this already, there is an excerpt from Trillium E included in the Braxton free sampler CD which is available as a free download here (music which spans over 30 years):
    http://tricentricfoundation.org/label/albums/65

    Track 7 is the excerpt.

    I love Trillium E, I believe it is a monumental musical achievement from one of the leading composers in the world, and agree with OperaNews which says of Trillium E, "...the opera's music possesses a savage immediacy that is at once ethereal and visceral. […] As both composer and conductor, Braxton possesses an impeccable sense of scale — the cacophony of the orchestra in uncanny solidarity with the unruly interjections of the vocalists. […] As a whole, the opera comes off like a radio-play reincarnation of The Twilight Zone. It's chaotic, and at times incomprehensible, but compelling — and essential listening for the adventurous opera-lover."

    The Wire says, "The top lines fly away riotously off the chords. The rhythms are often fast and treacherous. Above all, it's great fun."

    Of course, I am hardly objective...

    Best,
    Kyoko Kitamura
    TCF Team


    Quote Originally Posted by gregk View Post
    I don't like opera, but I do like just about everything Braxton. Am I going to like Trillium E? Do I want this set?

  10. #205
    Registered User gregk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kit View Post
    […] As a whole, the opera comes off like a radio-play reincarnation of The Twilight Zone. It's chaotic, and at times incomprehensible, but compelling — and essential listening for the adventurous opera-lover."
    What I bolded is what concerns me. I am definitely the furthest that one can be from being an "opera-lover".

  11. #206
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregk View Post
    What I bolded is what concerns me. I am definitely the furthest that one can be from being an "opera-lover".
    LOL. I may understand... I am certainly not an opera-lover myself, but love this one.

    This video http://youtu.be/RSndcMl3TXg shows 14 minutes of a live reading of Trillium E. If you like this, you will like the opera; if you don't, then perhaps not...

    Lots of backstage info here: http://anthonybraxton.wordpress.com/...es-from-day-5/

    You can also see more rehearsal and recording photos here:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/kyokoki...7623489853435/

    The libretto is wonderfully imaginative yet filled with the most delightful realistic elements; a couple asking a genie for "thirty-eight million, two hundred thousand, fifty-seven dollars and thirty-eight cents. (And spare me small bills that contain G plated serial numbers please - with exchange rate levels consistent with the Zurich Security Index.)," clones engaging in conversation about which channel to watch, a battle with aliens... Yet, underlying all this is Braxton's serious compassion for humanity and questions about today's world.

    Best,
    Kyoko

  12. #207
    Registered User xybert's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    I will be picking up Trillium E at some point this year...

    I picked up the Arista/Mosaic set a couple of weeks ago so needless to say i've had my ears full, and will have for some time. I put off getting this set for a long time, partly due to the price, but mostly because i've really been into his more recent stuff and there's always been individual albums here and there that i've been more keen on than plunking down a wad of cash for the Mosaic set. Anyway, this set truly lives up to the hype. To single one album out, 'New York, Fall 1974' is just mind blowing jazz... just so many magic moments... the ingenious composition of a track like Opus 23D, which starts out with a very similar vibe to Ornette's 'The Blessing', although slightly more dour, and you think that the head is done and Braxton is starting a solo over a conventional rhythm and walking bass line, and then Kenny Wheeler comes in and they seem to be soloing simultaneously, but then it forms up into this unison composed thing and it's clear we are still in 'head' (for want of a better way of putting it) territory... just one of many magic, expectation defying moments that for me make for really fresh sounding 'jazz'...

    Fans probably don't need to be sold on this set, but i highly recommend anyone, especially those into vinyl, to at least keep an eye out for a copy of 'New York, Fall 1974' on your travels... if you dig, say, 'Conference of the Birds' then this will be utterly up your alley...

    While i'm here, also want to recommend another album i've been listening to a lot lately, 'Creative Orchestra (Koln) 1978':



    Utterly, utterly spectacular. By turns dissonant, melodious, swinging, funky, conventional, psychedelic, avant garde, 'marching bandy'... again, if you're a Braxton fan i don't need to sell it, other than to say that it's a must buy/hear... for the uninitiated or dubious, it could be worth a roll of the dice! I really can't recommend it highly enough. It's become an instant favourite for me. Cheers.

  13. #208
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    If you are interested, the Tri-Centric Foundation offers bootlegs downloads for free, which includes recordings from that time period.

    http://tricentricfoundation.org/bootlegs

    One of my favorites are:
    Quartet Avignon (1974) and Bremen (1975) with
    Anthony Braxton: Saxophones, Flute
    Kenny Wheeler: Trumpet
    Dave Holland: Bass
    Barry Altschul: Drums

    And Quartet New York (1993)
    Anthony Braxton: Reeds
    Marilyn Crispell: Piano
    Mark Dresser: Bass
    Gerry Hemingway: Percussion

    The site will be revamped on March 1st, with more historic bootlegs on the way.

    And, yes, the Creative Orchestra Koln (1978) is gorgeous!!!

    Best,
    Kyoko

  14. #209
    Registered User Vaughan's Avatar
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    Huh, I've been playing all kinds this afternoon, from Wadada Leo Smith to Tim Berne. But this was in there also:



    This is a really nice CD, Max Roach is wonderful on tuned drums, using every potential of his instrument. Meanwhile Braxton is Braxton, in turns atonal and then in a groove. Only an accomplished musician would be able to so easily switch contexts and do so with conviction.

  15. #210
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    Quote Originally Posted by kit View Post
    If you are interested, the Tri-Centric Foundation offers bootlegs downloads for free, which includes recordings from that time period.

    http://tricentricfoundation.org/bootlegs

    One of my favorites are:
    Quartet Avignon (1974) and Bremen (1975) with
    Anthony Braxton: Saxophones, Flute
    Kenny Wheeler: Trumpet
    Dave Holland: Bass
    Barry Altschul: Drums

    And Quartet New York (1993)
    Anthony Braxton: Reeds
    Marilyn Crispell: Piano
    Mark Dresser: Bass
    Gerry Hemingway: Percussion

    The site will be revamped on March 1st, with more historic bootlegs on the way.

    And, yes, the Creative Orchestra Koln (1978) is gorgeous!!!

    Best,
    Kyoko
    Indeed excellent. I would love it if more artists made archival recordings available (I'll pay).

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