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Thread: Jazz Chords

  1. #1
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    Talking Jazz Chords

    Hi guys, am not fairly new to piano. I play by ear. I have been looking for a full reference of jazz chords that are played in key C. please help me out.
    Just all the Jazz chords i can play with and in the Key of C. Bail me out
    Last edited by wawaxz; November 21st, 2004 at 07:07 AM. Reason: more details

  2. #2
    Jesus Out of USA
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    You will find more than you can ever imagine at the following web site:

    http://www.jazzbooks.com/

    If you are serious at all about learning jazz you better get to know Aebersold.

  3. #3
    What?
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    hahaha....I think, if you're serious about learning jazz, stay away from aebersolds.....

    but, if you're looking for this stuff, check thses out.

    quick chord reference - a list of chord names, symbols, and interval structure.

    online piano chord thingee - fun little gizmo - lets you pick a root, chord quality and it shows/plays it for you....also scales as well. Very useful.

  4. #4
    To Be... or Not to BeBop
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    Here's a couple charts:

    Jazz Chords

    Jazz Scales

    And a couple utilities:

    Virtual Piano Chords and Scales

    Virtual Guitar Chords



    .
    If you dig Jazz visit
    www.apassion4jazz.net

  5. #5
    Registered User benny's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sonic1
    If you are serious at all about learning jazz you better get to know Aebersold.
    i'm serious about learning jazz, and i'd never even heard of aebersold until i found this forum, and trust me, i don't think i really missed out on much not having discovered aebersold...

    if you're really serious, you'll do two things...

    first thing to do
    work out chords you can use yourself...

    all your baisic chords are built in intervals of thirds...

    Key of C has the notes C, D, E, F, G, A, B in it.

    your most basic chords are based on a triad (triad becuase tri=3, three notes)... intervals of thirds because you count three between each note... example:

    first triad in key of C is obviously going to be C something.
    count three up from C, and we get E, three up from E and we get G,
    C, E, G
    that's a C major triad.
    next one will start on D,
    D, F, A
    D minor triad...
    what makes them major or minor??? if you don't know, sit down at your keyboard and find the differenece between those two chords there... if you don't know, a little hint will be that a C minor triad has the notes C, Eb, G.

    find the triad for each note in the key of C.
    work out if it's major or minor... only one you will stumble on if you're unfamiliar with this stuff is the one starting on B... this is called B diminished... as a hint as to what makes it diminished, compare -
    C diminished has C, Eb, Gb.

    as a quick note, every triad has a root, third and fifth...
    C major has
    C as the root
    E as the thrid
    G as the fifth

    now, to make them 'jazz chords'... add the seventh... this is simply a third up from the fifth of the chord... so;
    C major7 is C, E, G, B
    D minor7 is D, F, A, C
    and so on...
    there will be two that will stump you here
    G dominant7 - G, B, D, F
    to work out the difference, compare
    C dominant7 - C, E, G, Bb

    and
    B minor7b5 OR B half diminished (often notated as a circle with a line through it)
    Bminor7b5 - B, D, F, A
    once again, to work out what it is, compare
    Cminor7b5 - C, Eb, Gb, Bb

    you can add other tones into the chords as well, the next most logical one to progress to is your 9th chords, but if you think about what i posted here, you should be able to figure out by now how to find the 9th... and there are many other tones you can play around with as well...

    sorry it's not the most black and white explanation, but i didn't intend it to be, coz you gotta atleast do a little thinking... there's all the tools you need to get started here...

    if you're feeling like playing around even more, you might like to dable in quartal harmony... this is building chords up in fourths instead of thirds as is normally done.

    seccond thing
    instead of getting to know aebersold (by this i guess sonic1 meant the play along series, not the man in person), get to know some real life musos and play with them.... you'll learn a lot more from one hour of this than 10 hours of aebersold... not that i'm discrediting aebersolds, i'm sure they're good for something to play along with, but they're in no way an essential part of the serious jazz musos education...
    bEnnY
    'The trouble with the rat race is that even if you win, you're still a rat'

  6. #6
    Jesus Out of USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by carmenodgie
    hahaha....I think, if you're serious about learning jazz, stay away from aebersolds.....
    Why do you say that? A lot of people find them useful. Not everyone has a live band to practice with and this helps a lot if you don't.

    I never understood why people put down methods that don't work for them but work for a lot of other people. I know a lot of really fine musicians who used aebersolds.

    The other helpful thing about aebersold is that his website has a forum with practicing musicians that help out beginners as well as each other out. Much better than a post with a couple of links will ever do.

  7. #7
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    [QUOTE=carmenodgie]hahaha....I think, if you're serious about learning jazz, stay away from aebersolds.....
    QUOTE]


    Aebersolds are good, especially if you've previously been playing by ear. That way while trying to learn the chords you can tell if you've played something wrong by how it vibes with the recording. I also like his scale syllabus, too. All in all, I do definately like playing with Jamey more than just a metronome.

  8. #8
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    [QUOTE=carmenodgie]hahaha....I think, if you're serious about learning jazz, stay away from aebersolds.....

    Sure is hard to stay away from Aebersold: Backing tracks on my iPod, guitar om my lap and grooving into the late hours. Can't do without them!

  9. #9
    What?
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    Quote Originally Posted by sonic1
    I never understood why people put down methods that don't work for them but work for a lot of other people. I know a lot of really fine musicians who used aebersolds.

    The other helpful thing about aebersold is that his website has a forum with practicing musicians that help out beginners as well as each other out. Much better than a post with a couple of links will ever do.
    I didn't really mean that aebersolds were never to be used - I just think that rehearsal with another human being is more productive. I find aebersolds useful in learning tunes, gets it in your head. But, as a creative tool for developing improvisors, they destroy the idea of sponteneity and interaction. If the comping patterns are the same every time, it doesn't allow for much listening and reaction to happen. Too often players on stage sound like they're playing with an Aebersold - not listening, no interation - not to say this is a direct result of working with play-alongs, but they certainly don't help in that aspect.

  10. #10
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    Try this for an example of double fourths. With the left hand play the following chords, ascending the C major scale: c f b, d g c, e a d, f b e, g c f, a d g, b e a, c f b. Start one octave below middle c. Play a c major scale with the right hand. This is the Ionian mode. If you you start on the second chord, d g f, you will be playing the dorian mode, which is a minor mode.

    A good jazz technique is to play the root and seventh in the left hand, and the other parts of a chord; the third, fifth, ninth, eleventh; in the right hand.

    A similar technique is to play the root and third in the left hand and other chord notes in the right hand. When playing II V chords, alternate these to two methods.

    Learn half diminished chords, diminished chords, dominant seventh chords.

    For the really cool chords try those built on the melodic minor scale, which is the same as the c major scale, except the e is flat.

    Finally you must learn these things, and a lot of other things, so well that you can play them by feel, without needing to look at the keyboard. And don't restrict yourself to c major.

  11. #11
    To Be... or Not to BeBop
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    Here's a simple formula for close piano voicing:

    http://www.apassion4jazz.net/piano-voicing.html

    Obviously there are numerous possibilities, but this is a pretty good entrance level guide.
    If you dig Jazz visit
    www.apassion4jazz.net

  12. #12
    Registered User Steve Guitar's Avatar
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    The links to these theory pages are great, but the exotic scales are different than what I play. Guess that is why they are exotic.

  13. #13
    To Be... or Not to BeBop
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    They're only exotic if you wear a Hawaiian shirt when playing the gig!








    If you dig Jazz visit
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